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Archive. Repertoire 1990/2011

Visit our interesting historic CND repertoire with Nacho Duato and some of the most important contemporary choreographers

Por Vos Muero. Nacho Duato
  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/11

    NACHO DUATO

    Born in Valencia/Spain, Nacho Duato began his professional dance education at the age of 18 at the Rambert School in London. He continued his studies at the Mudra School of Maurice Béjart and eventually completed his education at the Ailey American Dance Center in New York.

    In 1980, Nacho Duato signed his first contract at the Cullberg Ballet in Stockholm. A year later, Jiří Kylián hired him for the Nederlands Dans Theter in Den Haag. For his achievements as a dancer, Nacho Duato was awarded the “VSCD Gouden Dansprijs” in 1987. His talent soon led Nacho Duato beyond being a dancer to devote himself to choreography, too. His first choreography for the Nederlands Dans Theater in 1983, “Jardí Tancat,” featuring Spanish-Catalonian music by Maria del Mar Bonet became a highly praised success and earned him the 1st prize of the International Choreographic Competition in Cologne.

    In 1986, Nacho Duato was appointed house choreographer of the Nederlands Dans Theater together with Hans van Manen and Jiří Kylián. During his tenure, he created more than a dozen choreographies including “Danza y Ritmo“ (Carlos Chávez), “Ucelli“ (Ottorino Respighi), “Synaphai“ (Iannis Xenakis/ Germanos Vangelis), “Boléro“ (Maurice Ravel), “Arenal“ (Maria del Mar Bonet), “Chansons Madécasses“ (Maurice Ravel), “Raptus“ (to Richard Wagner’s Wesendonck Lieder), “Dreams of Ether“ (Marcel Landowsky), “Lament“ (Henryk Górecki). For most of his productions he collaborated with stage designer Walter Nobbe.

    In 1990, the Culture Ministry in Madrid invited Nacho Duato to return to Spain and offered him the leadership of the Compañía Nacional de Danza. There, he formed a large œuvre and gained worldwide recognition with his ensemble. During his 20 years with the Compañía, he created more than 30 productions for its repertory, among others: “Cor perdut“ (Mar del Mar Bonet, 1989), “Concierto Madrigal“ (Joaquín Rodrigo, 1990), “Opus piat“ (Ludwig von Beethoven, 1990), “Rassemblement“ (Toto Bissainthe, 1990), “Na Floresta“ (Heitor Villa-Lobos/ Wagner Tisso, 1990), “Kaburias“ (Leo Brouwer, 1991), “Duende“ (Claude Debussy, 1991), “Empty“ (Musikcollage, 1991), “Coming together“ (Frederic A. Rzewski, 1991), “Mediterrania“ (Musikcollage, 1992), “Cautiva“ (Alberto Iglesias, 1993), “Alone, for a second“ (Erik Satie, 1994), “Tabulae“ (Alberto Iglesias, 1995), “Ecos“ (Stephan Micus, 1994), “Cero sobre cero“ (Alberto Iglesias, 1995), “Por vos muero“ (Musik des 16. Jahrhunderts, 1996), “Self“ (Alberto Iglesias, 1997), “Ofrenda de sombras“ (Musik des 16. Jahrhunderts, 2000), „Arcangelo“ (Arcangelo Corelli u.a., 2000), „White Darkness“ (Karl Jenkins, 2001), “Txalaparta“ (Kepa Junkera, 2001), “Castrati“ (Antonio Vivaldi/Karl Jenkins, 2002), “L’ Homme“ (G György Kurtág, 2003), “Herrumbre“ (Pedro Alcalde/Segio Caballero, 2004), “Diecisiete“ (Pedro Alcalde/ Segio Caballero, 2005), “Hevel“ (Pedro Alcalde/Sergio Caballero, 2007), “O domina nostra“ (Henryk Górecki, 2008) and “Cobalto“ (Pedro Alcalde/Sergio Caballero, 2009).

    During his time at the Compañía Nacional de Danza, Nacho Duato also worked for other companies. In 1992, he created “Duende” for the Nederlands Dans Theater featuring music by Claude Debussy. At the American Ballet Theatre, he created “Remanso” featuring music by Enrique Granados in 1997 and “Without Words“ (Franz Schubert) in 1998. In the same year, he choreographed “Romeo and Juliet“ (Sergei Prokofiev), his first full-length ballet. “Multiplicity. Forms of Silence and Emptiness“ (Johann S. Bach, 2000), “Alas“ (2006), “Infinite Garden“ (2010) succeeded. In Berlin, Nacho Duato adapted “Duende“ for the Deutsche Oper Berlin in 1995, “Without Words“ for the Ballert of Staatsoper Unter den Linden in 2002, and “Arcangelo“ with the Staatsballett Berlin in 2012.

    One year after his 20th anniversary at the Compañía Nacional de Danza, Duato left Spain and was appointed Artistic Director of the Mikhailovsky Theatre in St. Petersburg on January 1st2011. There, he staged two world premieres in 2011, “Nunc Dimittis“ and “Invisible“, and developed his own versions of “Sleeping Beauty”, “Romeo and Juliet” and “The Nutcracker”.

    In 2014, he created “DepakIne“ for the Martha Graham Dance Company. By now, his work is included in the repertories of the most important ballet companies worldwide, including the Ballet de l’Opéra National de Paris, the Cullberg Ballet, the Nederlands Dans Theater, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, the Australian Ballet, the Stuttgarter Ballett, the Ballet Gulbenkian, the Finnish Opera Ballet, the San Francisco Ballet, the Royal Ballet Covent Garden, the Bolshoi Ballett, the Boston Ballet, the Royal Danish Ballet, the Royal Swedish Ballet, the American Ballet Theatre, the Staatsballett Berlin, and the Ballet of the Mikhailovsky Theatre St. Petersburg.

    Nacho Duato received multiple awards as a choreographer: “Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres” from the French embassy in Spain in 1995, the gold medal for Fine Arts from the Spanish government in 1998, “Benois de la danse” for his choreography “Multiplicity. Forms of Silence and Emptiness“ in 2000, and “Premio Nacional de Danza” for choreography in 2003. Furthermore, the Spanish Department of Foreign Affairs awarded him the “Medalla al Merito Civil”. In 2015, he received the prize of the city of Alcalá for arts and literature. In 2016, he became honorary citizen of his home town Valencia.

    Starting with the 2014 / 2015 season, Nacho Duato become Artistic Director of the Staatsballett Berlin. After staging his choreographies “Sleeping Beauty”, “Multiplicity. Forms of Silence and Emptiness”, “White Darkness”, “Herrumbre”, “Castrati”, “The Nutcracker” and the new pieces called “Static Time” and “Erde”, he will present “Romeo and Juliet” and “Por vos muero” in the ongoing season.

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    Without Word de Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Franz Schubert 
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato 
    • Light Design: Brad Fields (based on the original idea of Nacho Duato)
    • Premiered by American Ballet Theater at City Center in New York, October 29th, 1998. Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro Arriaga in Bilbao, December 9th, 1998.

    Without Words is Nacho Duato’s second work for the prestigious American Ballet Theater company. The title refers to Schubert’s songs scores, which are instrumental music, music without words. Mischa Malsky transcribed for cello the composition’s voices in a recording in which the pianist Daria Hovora also participated. As in the songs, the choreographer strips the dancing of any evident romantic atmosphere. Love and death appear as the central subjects derived from the music, but through Duato the work is presented with a contemporary contribution to the 19th century's obsession, so present in Schubert’s creations. A new world, with all its possibilities, is revealed in a dark existential scenographic space typical of the 20th century. Duato shows a universal vital cycle in all its spontaneity, free of unnecessary alignments and ornaments.

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    White Darkness de Nacho Duato. Escenografía: Jaffar Chalabi
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Karl Jenkins (Adiemus Variations, String Quartet nº 2)
    • Sets: Jaffar Chalabi
    • Costumes: Lourdes Frías
    • Light Design: Joop Caboort
    • World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela in Madrid, November 16th, 2001.

    Nacho Duato’s work for the Compañía Nacional de Danza follows his creative development of the last years. The choreographer researches choreographic formulae through the movement and starting from a deep musical knowledge. These choreographic formulae enlarge his vocabulary departing always from his dancers’ potential expressiveness.

    Karl Jenkins: born in 1944, of a Welsh mother and Swedish father. At the age of six he started his piano studies encouraged by his father, a chorus director and organist. Later, at the age of eleven, he started to play the oboe and to work at the National Youth Orchestra of Wales. He also studied composition at University of Wales at Cardiff, finishing his training in the Royal Academy of Music in London, where he specialized in playing the saxophone. He received awards for his oboe interpretations for jazz and as a multi-instrumentalist. Jenkins worked, amongst others, with Ronnie Scott and created Nucleus, winning the first prize of Montreal Jazz Festival, in 1972. Later, he joined Soft Machine. This group of the seventies’ played a wide range of styles (jazz, classic, rock and even minimalism). In April 1995, Jenkins published Adiemus – Songs of Sanctuary, an extensive work composed for voice, percussion and string, which was an unprecedented success in Europe and Japan.


    Compañía Nacional de Danza, White Darkness

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    Txalaparta. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Kepa Junkera y Oreka TX
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Sets: Jaffar Al Chalabi 
    • Lighting Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.)
    • Length: 27’ 50”
    • World premiere by  the Nederlands Dans Theater at the Muziektheatre, Amsterdam, January 26th, 1988. Premiere by the Compañía  Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Romea, Murcia, October 6th, 1990.

    Arenalis choreography by Nacho Duato, inspired by songs of María del Mar Bonet. In this ballet, the choreographer’s purpose has been to show the uninhibited cheerfulness of the Mediterranean personality contrasting with the everyday struggle of life. Duato makes this contrast very obvious. On the one hand, there is the dancing of a group of men and women motivated by the pure joyfulness of music. Its jubilation is reflected in the clear movements of the dancers -pas de deux, pas de trois, pas de quatre- to Greek songs translated into Catalonian and Majorcan ones by María del Mar Bonet.
    On the other hand, one woman dancer stands apart, dancing alone to four songs which are performed a capella. These songs are of a realistic content and seem to arise from an agonizing outcry of the heart. The dancer’s movements are nearer to the ground than those of the others. This is to express the influence of the land. Colour, choreography, movement, everything is undeniably Mediterranean.
    Nacho Duato had worked before with María del Mar Bonet in another ballet: Jardí Tancat. “Her music constitutes an important source of inspiration for my work”, says the choreographer. “Later, while I was listening to her record Gavines i Dragons, the idea of Arenal immediately occurred to me. At once, I began to consider the possibility of María del Mar Bonet joining us to give a live performance of her songs”. Duato sees Arenal as an extension of his first work, Jardí Tancat, “though it is more vital, livelier, and more faithful to the inner rhythm of the songs themselves, without abandoning the worlds of people and of work”.                                                      
    I have always known that my songs were born with rhythm, but I only became really aware of it the day Nacho Duato danced to them. When I saw the first choreography,Jardí Tancat, I was really excited. He had given them another life. They were independent, and at the same time, still mine. Yet they had acquired a new palpitation. They had taken a different road. There is something in Arenal that has always fascinated me: the treatment of the Majorcan work songs which I sing a capella. These are songs which form part of our earliest Majorcan tradition, but which are no longer sung where they come from or what they were created for, that is work in the fields. There are hardly any places in Majorca where work in the country is still the same as forty or fifty years ago. However, when Nacho used the songs  for his choreographies he gave them back this role of unique pieces, as if they were precious stones.
    While Jardí Tancat, was so full of life, in Arenal I have been discovering an inner passion each time I sing with them. I will never tire of repeating that these choreographies of Nacho Duato  are one of the most precious artistic gifts I have ever received. I believe they belong to that type of thing which goes hand in hand with the most deeply felt emotions and is hard to explain in words.
    Thank you, Nacho.

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    Tabulae de nacho Duato. Bailarina: Luisa María Arias
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Alberto Iglesias 
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato, in collaboration with  Ismael Aznar 
    • Sets: Nacho Duato 
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro Madrid, on April 14th, 1994 

    • “There were ghosts that returned to earth to hear his phrases / As he sat there reading, aloud, the great blue tabulae /They were those from the wilderness of stars that had expected more /“There it was, word for word, / The poem that took the place of a mountain” Wallace Stevens, Collected Poems 

    • Although these poetic fragments were a starting point for this new ballet, something that inspired a mutual sentiment it also held true in our earlier collaboration Cautiva, which had left us hanging from that very point that allows us to name some concepts with the same name. Those points of clarity sketched the double nature of the first note and its evaporation in the movement. Later on, we took care of the mysterious play of alternations, which fix the poetic both in dance and in music. And so, from that moment on, each one invented his own way, and whilst one said ’to impulse’ the other  said ’to increase’; and if one said ’rotate’ the other would rather say ’hang from a point’. And in this way, the senses could be so crossed that in a board of equivalences ’to open’ would be ’to forget’, ’to close’ is ’to repeat’and ’nothing’ is ’nothing’. ’Obsession’ is ’obsession’ and ’fountain of silk’ is ’something which cannot be seen, but which achieves a command’. Those and others have been our terms. They remain hidden/submerged, in the same way that the city forgets its building and offers its streets or corners as though they had been built long ago.

    • Nacho Duato and Alberto Iglesias

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    Synaphai. Nacho Duato. Bailarina: Catherine Allard
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Iannis Xenakis (Synaphai, concerto for piano and orchestra) Vangelis (Heaven and Hell) 
    • Sets and costumes: Walter Nobbe 
    • Light Design: Edward Effron
    • Worldpremiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater at the Circustheater, Scheveningen, January 16, 1986.
    • Premiered by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Lensoviet Palace Theatre, Leningrad, November 22, 1990.
    • Synaphai, a concerto for piano and orchestra composed by Iannis Xenakis, motivated Nacho Duato to express in this ballet the central choreographic idea in a plastic manner. It has been Duato's intention to highlight human feelings from an essentially individual point of view. The ballet is structured in three parts: In the first one, a groupof eight dancers move in one block, under a strange confusion of voices, narrating in seven different languages but in unison a text written by Duato himself, concerning survival, death, loneliness. The movements, with their hieratic touches, remind us of the Egyptian funerary monuments. Xenakis' music is heard in the second part, when the set of dancers breaks upand a series of solos, duos, and trios are performed, full of abrupt and desperate movements. 

      The dancers feel a continuous attraction to the ground, as if it were a force taking hold of them. They try to break free, fighting without success against the wall. In the third part, a pas de deux on music composed by Vangelis opens upan encouraging road. It's the calm that follows the storm. Nacho Duato did not pretend to present us with a final solution to the human strain and anguish; only an individual answer could lead us to a conclusion.

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    Sueños de Éter. Nacho Duato. Bailarina: Luisa María Arias
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Marcel Landowski (Concert pour ondes Martenot, 1954)
    • Sets: Nacho Duato 
    • Costumes: Lourdes Frías 
    • Light Design: Brad Fields
    • World premiered by Nederlands Dans Theater at the Lucent Dans Theater, Den Hag, September 11th, 1986. Premiered by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria, Santander, April 5th, 2002.

    Dreams of Ether was originally created by the Artistic Director of the Compañía Nacional de Danza for the prestigious Nederlands Dans Theater. The piece takes us into a dream world, where eight women dance their dreams/nightmares within an extremely oppressive atmosphere. 

    The music by Landowski calls for a world where everything turns into a metaphysical speech, through which one can understand life through sounds. Joy, meditation, sorrow, frustration, desire, all these emotions developed by the eight performers in this ballet have their roots in the Concert pour Ondes Martenot for percussion and string orchestra by the wonderful French composer.

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    Sinfonía India. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Carlos Chávez (Sinfonía India, 1936) 
    • Sets: Walter Nobbe 
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato 
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiered by Nederlands Dans Theater at Circus Theater in Scheveningen, 7th June, 1984. Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela in Madrid, 8th October, 1987.

    Sinfonía India is composed upon the play equally titled by the Mexican music composer Carlos Chávez, who had premiered it in 1936, conducting the Columbia Bradcasting Symphony Orcherstra, in New York. Although Chávez, who passed away in 1978 at 79 years of age, belonged to the nacionalist school, he rarely used Mexican floklore elements in his compositions. Nevertheless, Sinfonía India, shows an exceptional display of authochthonous sounds especially in the field of percussion, originally written by Chávez for a groupof Indian primitive instruments. The choreograph has maintained the flockore origins which inspired the musical score and has poured them into his ballet, neither in the structure nor in the movement, but in the generating idea of the work and more evidently in the scenography and costumes. "The ballet contains a reference to the ritual dance of of the Mexican indians - Duato explains-, in which a person was sacrified and his heart was offered to the Sun. This reference appears in the ballet as something symbolic, abstract, as although movements shows an archaic air, the style is absolutely contameporary".

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    Self. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Alberto Iglesias
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Lighingt Design: Nacho Duato (according to the versión of Miguel Ángel Camacho)
    • World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria, Santander, April 17th, 1997 in colaboration with Thêatre de Saint-Quentin-En-Yvelines, Paris.

    Self implies the fourth collaboration between Nacho Duato and Alberto Iglesias. This composer has worked with Duato in Cautiva (1993), Tabulae (1994) and Cero sobre Cero (1995). In a world where worries of a material kind seem to take over our lives, the human being as such is being relegated to a marginal place within our comprehension of reality. Something seems to place itself between each human being and his conception of himself and other people in their own right. This seems, therefore, to be the right moment to reflect on the human being's essence, as something which preserves its value, despite appearing hidden behind a thick fog composed of factors foreign to its very centre. That person, who each of us carries within oneself, accompanies one throughout one's  existence and implies the true reality for each one of us.

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    Romeo y Julieta. Nacho Duato. Bailarina: Luisa María Arias
    • Music: Sergei Prokofiev
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • General concept of costumes, scenography, and lighting: Nacho Duato
    • Costumes: Lourdes Frías
    • Scenography: Carles Pujol and  Pau Rueda (Centre Cultural Sant Cugat)
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.) (based on the work of Miguel Ángel Camacho)
    • Premiere by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria, Santander, January 8th, 1998.

    • Romeo and Juliet is the first full-length ballet by Compañía Nacional de Danza. The piece is divided in two acts, based on Prokofiev's music and with the choreography of its Artistic Director, Nacho Duato. The choreography has been designed faithfully respecting Shakespeare's drama. The thirty dancers who compose the Compañía's cast will perform this new creation.

      The general concept of the work, in terms of scenography, costumes, lighting and, of course, choreography, is Nacho Duato's original idea. For this work, he has been able to count on several assistants, including: Lourdes Frías, for costume design, Pablo Rueda and Carles Pujol of the Centre Cultural Sant Cugat, for the design and carrying out of the choreography, and Nicolás Fischtel for light design.

      Romeo and Juliet is, doubtlessly, a challenge for Duato as a choreographer, as well as for all those involved in its staging. Mar Baudesson and Kim McCarthy will head the cast as Juliet and Romeo, respectively. The rest of the cast will involve all of the Compañía's dancers. This is the first ballet in two acts created by Nacho Duato.  As he himself admits, the idea of creating a ballet based on this work of Shakespeare's has been in his mind for many years. But it is  now, in his maturity as a creator, and counting  on the members of the Compañía Nacional de Danza's cast, who are perfectly in harmony with his artistic line, when he has decided to take this important step in his career as a choreographer.

      Prokofiev was commissioned to write Romeo and Juliet by the Bolshoi in 1934. The score was completed by the Autumn of 1935 but several difficulties arose and the staging of the ballet was postponed. Finally, Prokofiev's score was converted into a ballet for the first time in Brno, then Czechoslovakia, with Viania Psota's choreography, in December 1938, while the Kirov staged it for the first time somewhat later, on the 11th January, 1940, with Leonid Lavrosvsky's choreography. In later years, the ballet's popularity increased irresistibly and was incorporated into the repertoire of all, or practically all, Soviet companies.

      Romeo and Juliet's story has been treated by many famous choreographers, even without Prokofiev's music. In Duato's case, he attempts a more humanistic approach to the story of the lovers of Verona, bringing it somehow closer- always through movement- to present-day men and women. The complexity of the drama lived by the main characters of Shakespeare's tragedy, the whirlwind of ideas and passions, as well as the intensity of feelings, require the ballet to encompass a subtle fusion of choreographical and theatrical languages, giving, as a result, a representation where the characters, emotion and passion are expressed by the ballet dancer's body movements. Duato's work, therefore, focuses on the expression of Shakespeare's romantic drama through dance in its own right and tries to discard all superfluous elements which could relegate to a second place what has always been his priority: expression through movement. This translates into a direct and human language, thus rapidly creating feeling around the story, progressing in crescendo  upto its tragic ending.

      For Duato, this version of Romeo and Juliet ought not to remain simply in the particular story of the lovers of Verona, but rather he wishes to point out to the spectator something more universal, which was always there in Shakespeare's drama: the story that tells us how passion and love can prevail over terrible obstacles,  overcoming the  barriers of hatred and incomprehension which frequently separate human beings. It is therefore a story for all seasons which has something to say to present- day men and women about their reality.

    • CND - Romeo y Julieta, Nacho Duato

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    Dance Picture. Remansos - Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Enrique Granados
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Lighting: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.) (Danza Oriental, Minueto, Danza Villanesca), 
    • Brad Fields (Valses Poéticos) 
    • First staged by the American Ballet Theater at the City Center of New York on November 5th 1997. Staged by the National Dance Company at the Theatre of Madrid, June 5th 1998.

    • Remansos, on the Poetic Waltzes of Granados, first staged in New York by the American Ballet Theater in November 1997, received the greatest praise from the specialist critics. Expressive strength, geometric lines, dynamic use of space and forms, were some of the remarks on the work by Duato. On the basis of that first version, the choreographer lengthened the work for Compañía Nacional de Danza, choreographing three of the most beautiful popular dances by the composer on this occasion to create this Remansos.

      Set to the piano music by Enrique Granados and inspired by the world of Lorca, Remansosis an outpouring of ingenuity, continually flirting with the audience in its perspicacious movement.

      Enrique Granados was born in Lérida on 27th July 1867. He studied piano in Barcelona and Paris. Throughout his life he was a composer, teacher and soloist. His works are mainly for the piano and vocal music. Even his earliest works show a new trend in Spanish music. Inclined toward popular tastes, all his music is of an exceptional quality and has an original style. Granados died young. The ship he was travelling in was torpedoed by a German submarine and sank. Although he managed to reach a lifeboat, he saw his wife drowning and jumped back into the sea: they both died.

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    Dance Picture. Rassemblement - Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Toto Bissainthe (Rasanbléman)
    • Sets: Walter Nobbe
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light  Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.) according to the original design by Dick Limdsctröm.
    • Staging: Lena Wennergren‑Juras
    • World premiere by Cullberg Ballet at Hjalmar Bergman Theater, Orebro, Sweden, February 27th, 1990. Premiere by Compañía  Nacional de Danza at the Teatro de la Zarzuela, December 13th, 1991.

    This time Duato has turned to Haiti and the music of Toto Bissainthe, with drive and sway. It has inspired Duato in the crisp,  clear-cut style of Jardí Tancat. Four couples, in shades of  grey working clothes, start calmly and build upto an arresting finish, with the word “liberté” repeated in the song. 

    Rassemblement is a creation which gradually, through the liberating powers of music and dance, proves to be an impressive, thrilling and audience affecting appeal for human rights. These songs are mostly slaves’ songs from the Voodoo cult. They express the daily life of the slaves, their longing for Africa, not as a geographical reality, but as a mythical land of freedom. They express their resistance and their refusal: resistance to the colonist, rejection of his politics, his religion, his culture and his language.

    During the history of Haiti, the face of the master has often changed. Capitalism, developing in Haiti, has transformed the sense of Voodoo. The ethnographer came first, and then the tourist for whom folklore was produced with revived exotic excitement. Voodoo, which for the poor exploited peasants, had been a celebration of the African roots of their increasingly more unbearable way of life, became a “religion”, one of the tools of power.

    The birth of Voodoo in a land of exile, the first common language among slaves of different ethnic backgrounds, was a vital creative moment, a cultural unification which was to transform the world: an opening for the confined. That is the moment we sing about. Using the traditional music of Haiti we meet with other musical forms to open a way towards a contemporary music that knows no frontiers.

    Toto Bissainthe
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    Raptus de Nacho Duato. Bailarines: Nacho Duato y Tamako Akiyama
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Richard Wagner Wesendonklieder
    • Sets: Walter Nobbe
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Joop Caboort 
    • Premiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater at AT&T Danstheater, Den Haag, October 20th, 1988. Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela de Madrid, November 22nd, 1996.

    Raptus, whose main characteristic lies in its passionate movements, is based on the romantic and emotive songs contained in Richard Wagner's Wesendonklieder. These songs were inspired by the very intense, albeit hopeless, relationship between Wagner and Mary Wesendonk which was destined to be broken off. Even though the choreographer does not portray their conflict directly, the images and atmosphere created convey, without doubt, an evocative emotion. Walter Nobbe's stage design plays and important role here. It consists of two large , thick moveable panels, one of whose sides is covered with reflecting material, and the other with images of the shoulders and head of a man and a woman. 

    The overall impression of Raptus is overwhelming, with uncontrolled passions leading to destruction. It is a ballet endowed with enormous intensity, in terms of movement, emotion and staging.

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    Ofrenda de Sombras. Nacho Duato. Bailarín: Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: collage music XVI and XVII centuries and Alberto Iglesias (electronic music)
    • Sets: Jaffar Chalabi
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato (in collaboration with Ismael Aznar)
    • Light Design: Brad Fields
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro Real de Madrid, May  31st , 2000.

    • Last year  saw  the four hundredth anniversary of the birth of one of the greatest painters of all time: Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez. Together with Rubens and Rembrandt, he was the  most representative painter of the baroque period. His trajectory is unlimited by time and he is still modern today. With Ofrenda de Sombras, Duato wishes to pay homage to the great master, taking inspiration from one of his greatest works: Las Meninas. The choreographer creates  a very personal world of private dreams and fantasy, which in its development approaches and departs from the story told in Velazquez’s painting, never failing to offer it as a reference to the spectator so that the source of inspiration is constantly present.

    • Music: Alberto Iglesias   1.Introduction 
    • Jordi Savall   Las Sombras
    • William Daman   Fantasia: Di sei soprani
    • Innocenzio Alberti   Pavan of Albarti
    • Alberto Iglesias   II. Tema electrónico
    • Henry Purcell   Fantasia upon one note
    • Marin Marais   Charivari
    • Alberto Iglesias   III. Tema electrónico
    • Luigi Rossi   Les Pleurs d’Orphée
    • Jean-Baptiste Lully   Sarabande: Air des Espagnols
    • Alberto Iglesias   IV. Tema electrónico
    • Juan Cabanilles   Tiento de Falsas
    • Jordi Savall   Las Sombras
    • Jean-Baptiste Lully   Danse de Neptune
  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Por Vos Muero de Nacho Duato. Bailarines: Dimo Kirilov y Tereza Gonzaga
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Old Spanish Music-XV and XVI centuries- Cançons de la Catalunya mil-lenària - El Mestre, popular of Catalonia by La Capella Reial de Catalunya, directed by Jordi Savall; Canciones y Danzas de España, and España, Antología de la Música Española 
    • Sets: Nacho Duato
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato and Ismael Aznar
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.)
    • Text: Garcilaso de la Vega
    • Voice: Miguel Bosé
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de Madrid, April 11th, 1996.

    • Duato was inspired by old Spanish music of the 15th and 16th centuries together with some of the most beautiful verses of the Spanish poet Garcilaso de la Vega. Music and poetry connect the obviously contemporary dance of Por Vos Muero to its historic reference.

    • In the 15th and 16th centuries dances formed part of the cultural expression of people, including all social hierarchies, and therefore they produced an honest reflection of culture of that time. Por Vos Muero wants to pay a tribute to the very important role that dance played in every sort of social event during those ancient times.


  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    O Domina Nostra de Nacho Duato. Bailarines: Dimo Kirilov y Tereza Gonzaga
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Henryk Górecki (O Domina Nostra, opus 55 (1982-1985/90); Sarah Leonard, soprano; Christopher Bowers-Broadbent, organ)
    • Sets: Nacho Duato and Odeon
    • Costumes: Francis Montesinos
    • Light Design: Joop Caboort
    • Worldpremiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Les Nuits de Fourvière, Lyon, July 21st, 2008.

    Nacho Duato is inspired tightly by the music of Górecki, under the same title. O Domina Nostra was conceived by the Polish composer in 1982, in celebration of the 600th anniversary of the Black Virgin of Jasnogora – a sacred symbol of Polish independence to whom, in times of crisis, Poland’s prayers are addressed. As in his wont, Górecki revised the piece in 1985 and again, for this recording, in 1990. It is scored for the combination of solo organ and intoning voice (soprano). It is precisely, the figure of the Virgin as the mother of Jesus Christ, as a link between the divine and eternal, and man and telluric force, what Duato wants to emphasize with this ballet, composed to be danced by ten men and a woman. 

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Na Floresta. Nacho Duato. Bailarina: Marina Jiménez
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Heitor Villa-Lobos/Wagner Tisso Scenery: Walter Nobbe 
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato 
    • Light Desing: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiered by the Netherlands Dans Theater 2 at the AT&T Danstheater in Den Hague, 15th February, 1990. Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro del Generalife, in Granada, 24th June, 1993.

    Na Floresta a magnificent triptych praising the beauty of the Amazonian rain forest, draws the very essence of its splendour from folklore. A passionate energy circulates within this work made up of sequences full of both substance and fluidity. Its success at its 1990 premiere was phenomenal. A plotless work to Villa-Lobos music intended to communicate an intimacy and a feeling for nature that is greater than our contact with other beings. "Nacho Duato has that rare quality that consists of being able to express things through the voices of simplicity, restraint and circumspection when it comes to expressing emotion".

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Dance Picture. Multiplicity, Forms of Silence and Emptiness - Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Johan Sebastian Bach (collage)
    • Sets: Jaffar Al Chalabi (based on an original idea of Nacho Duato)
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato (in collaboration with Ismael Aznar)
    • Light Design: Brad Fields 
    • In co-production with Weimar 1999, Cultural European Capital
    • World Premiere in Weimar at the Viehauktionshalle on the 23rd of April, 1999. Pre-premiere in Spain at Teatro Calderón,  Valladolid, on the 9th of April, 1999.

    • Vielfältigkeit. Formen von Stille und Leere is the result of the co production between the city of Weimar -European Cultural Capital in 1999- and the CND. A ballet was commissioned to Nacho Duato which somehow had some special link with the city. For Duato the answer could only be one: Bach. Nacho’s ballet is therefore inspired in the music and life of Johan Sebastian Bach and is divided into two parts.

    • The first one, Vielfältigkeit, is a choreographic reflexion which arises mainly from the wonderful music of the brilliant composer. This first part is characterized by a choreographic variety and diversity which matches the linked different musical excerpts by Bach. Continuos changes in costumes and settings highlight visually this musical collage.

    • The second part, Formen von Stille und Leere, maintains a more introspective tone, more mystic and spiritual, reflecting upon the subject of the death, so present in the work of Bach. Musically speaking it is based mainly on the Arte of Fugue.

    • Folding: towards a visual conception

      Stage design, J.S. Bach Vielfaeltigkeit, Formen von stille und Leere

      Vielfaeltigkeit, i.e. multiple-folds, diversity, multiplicity, labyrinth, refers to the processual idea of folding. The Baroque refers not to an essence but rather to an operative function to a trait. It endlessly produces folds. The Baroque trait twists turns its folds, pushing them to infinity fold over fold, one upon the other. The Baroque unfurls all the way to infinity.

      An architectural conceptions invisions the thematic of Baroque music of J. S. Bach, through the process of folding. In architecture, the fold provides a model for theories of metamorphosis and covering (Bekleidung, Gottfried von Semper). Folds are maneuverable borders which separate an interior from the exterior, yet also create an interior within the exterior and an exterior within the interior. Considered abstractly, it is only the type of bend -concave or convex- that determines inside and outside, meaning the gender of the space. In this unfixed state, the fold provides a model of transformation.

      A scaffold set at the back of a stage acting as building retaining a curtain wall, that transforms itself from opened to closed entity. This architectural gender of the Baroque, represents the separation of the façade (exterior) and the closed room (interior), the outer facade of reception and the inner rooms of action. Baroque architecture is always confronting to principles, a bearing principle and a covering principle. The geometrically ordered scaffold enhances several floors all connected through ramps creating a fluid movement. These ramps represent vertical folding, spatial continuum, all set in diagonal relations (dynamic) within a rigid structure (static).

      In contrast to the building, the façade consist of an elastically membrane that transforms itself through contractions and extensions. These contractions provide literal models of folds, simulating zones of intervals and densification. 

      Jaffar Chalabi


    CND - Multiplicidad. Formas de Silencio y Vacío, Nacho Duato 

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Meditarrania. Nacho Duato. Bailarines: Thoman Klein a Isaac Montllor
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Jerónimo Messo/María del Mar Bonet/Peter Griggs/Lissa Gerrard/Brendan Perry/Juan A. Arteche/Javier Paxariño
    • Sets: Nacho Duato
    • Costumes: Luis Devota and Modesto Lomba
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World Premiere by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Principal, Valencia, 9th July 1992. Production sponsored by Mediterrania, the Comunidad de Valencia, Generalitat de Valencia, ITVA.

    It is usually music which inspires me when creating a new ballet. On this occasion, the sea and its light, fire and its meaning in our culture, as well as the fertility of the land have been my sources of inspiration to create this choreography dedicated to the Valencian Community.

    With this work I would like to express intimate feelings and images: the presence of my roots whose very essence even after having been abroad for long periods of time and influenced by various other cultures I have always felt in my veins.

    I have avoided using folk elements, historic references, anecdotes or allusions to characters, trying to communicate, through movement, the sensuality of the landscape, the sensitivity of its inhabitants and their uninhibited worship of the ephemeral, so characteristic of this Community.

    Avoiding the stereotype has meant doing without the artifice of music, costumes and scenography in order to achieve simplification. This may seem somewhat cold if compared with the exuberance in the daily lives of our people; but I do hope to express that vitality through movement.

    In order to achieve this, I have used percussion and wind sounds always wrapped upin the constant sound of water. I did this not only because they identify Valencian culture, but also because they have helped me to find movements closer to the earth, of a telluric strength, and therefore to get a better contrast for the most delicate movements. This is exemplified in the pas de deux of El Azahar.

    I have simply tried to retrace my roots and those of my ancestors. I have tried to peel the orange to get to its flesh, the ludic and sensual spirit of this land, always intimately related to the sea. I dedicate this ballet to all those who, like myself, feel complicity with the Mediterranean. 

    Nacho Duato

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    L'Homme. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: György Kurtág (Játékok, Átiratok Machaut-tól J. S. Bach) ( Interpreted to the piano for György and Marta Kurtág and Pedro Alcalde)
    • Sets: Nacho Duato
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato (with the collaboration of Ismael Aznar)
    • Light Design: Joop Caboort
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro Real de Madrid, April 30th, 2003.

    The choreography uses a selection of György Kurtág’s works for piano for two hands and for four hands included in vols. I to VII of his Játékok series and three of his J. S. Bach transcriptions for piano for four hands from the volume, Átiratok Machut-tól J.S. Bach. 

    L’Homme begins with an epigrammatic work that figures in the composer’s catalogue as: “Virág az ember...” (Játékok VIII/1,3ª: “Flowers we are, Mere Flowers..”. the title comes from a fragment of a 16th century Hungarian writer, Péter Bornemisza, to whom Kurtág dedicated one of his most important vocal cycles (op.7). The “musical flower” forming it, together with the text, represents one of the cornerstones upon which the composer’s world of sound is built. And it is precisely this composition that originally inspired Duato to speak to us in his choreography of the ephemeral character of existence, of human frailty, as perishable and fleeting as the life cycle of a flower. Following this work, the three transcriptions for piano for four hands sustain like pillars the brief compositions of Játékok, following the model of interrelation proposed by the composer and his wife Márta in numerous recitals and in his recording for the German label EMC. 

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Lamento. Nacho Duato. Música: Henryk M. Górecki Sinfonía Nº 3
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Henryk Górecki Third Symphony
    • Settings: Walter Nobbe
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Edward Effron
    • World premiered by Nederlands Dans Theater II at the AT&T Danstheater of  The Hague, May 24th, 1990. Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Real de Madrid, September 13th, 2000.

    For Nacho Duato the need to both experience and express movement in an intensive manner has always been an important reason to dance. Since developing his skills as a choreographer he has deliberately increased his own ‘repertoire of movement’ in order to have sufficient material at his disposal for his own creations. The need to express dance in this way is powerfully evident in his ballet Lament. It is his final work as permanent choreographer with the NDT and a turning point in his career. With this ballet Nacho Duato wanted to create an intensely personal piece of work. He began with only a basic idea and let it develop in the studio with a groupof personally-selected dancers. 

    The ballet is about many things, but the choreographer has been inspired not only by Gorecki’s Symphony of the Sorrowful, but also by images of tormented and oppressed people by Goya and Käthe Kollwitz. In their works these artists portray mankind suffering. A place where such things could occur was the starting point for Walter Nobbe’s stylized stage-set. Nacho Duato evokes dramatic images by means of violent movements. The images are clear as to their emotional charge, but have no precise ‘meaning’ and the ‘roles’ are not fixed: anyone can become a victim, but also a perpetrator. The ballet shows that this happens time and time again. According to the choreographer this cannot really be understood, but it should be contemplated, to be, later,  a subject of inner reflection. 

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Kol Nidre. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: John Tavener, Arvo Pärt and John Zorn
    • Scenography and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Lighting Design: Joop Caboort
    • Premiered by the Compañía Nacional de Danza 2 at the Teatro de Madrid, on 22nd January 2009. Premiered by the Compañía Nacional de Danza in the Gran Teatro Falla of Cádiz, on 30th October 2009.

    Kol Nidre is the name of the declaration recited in the synagogue, prior to commencement of the evening service of Yom Kippur. Its name is taken from the initial letters of the declaration and it is a time to reflect and forgive.

    These are the building blocks taken by Duato in his new creation for the Compañía Nacional de Danza 2 and from October 2009, Kol Nidre is also incorporates to the repertoire of CND. It is a more introspective, spiritual work that reflects on the situation of the youngest during armed conflict: those known as “war children”.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Kaburias. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Leo Brouwer (Elogio de la Danza)
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Festival Internacional de Danza de Itálica in Seville, June 22nd, 1991.

    Kaburías is a solo inspired by Leo Bouwer's guitar music. The choreographer recalls the spell of flamenco employing the confrontation between two worlds: that of Kabuki and that of Flamenco ("bulerias": traditional Andalusian song and dance).

    This solo is structured in two parts: in the first part, the dancer's movements remind us of the world of Kabuki. And, in the second part, one can appreciate the influence of the art of flamenco, accentuated by the wardrobe (skirts and flounces).

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Jardín Infinito. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music (*): Pedro Alcalde, Sergio Caballero (original music) Alfred Schnitke and Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky (fragment)
    • Set Design: Jaffar Chalabi
    • Lighting Design: Brad Fields
    • Costumes: Cayetano Carral and Pilar Carral
    • Set Production: Odeón Decorados
    • Costume made by: CND WardrobeDedicated to Chekhov on the 150th anniversary of his birth.
    • In collaboration with the International Anton Chekhov Theatre Festival of Moscow, with support by the Government of Russia and the City Council of Moscow.

    Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Real (Madrid) on 17th February 2010.

    “Jardín Infinito (Infinite Garden)” is a homage to Anton P. Chekhov. I have attempted to impregnate myself with the personality of that great writer, of how he lived and what he felt for his fellow men and the world around him. Infinite Garden is not based on any specific work by Chekhov. I did not want situations, references or anecdotes related to them to constitute the basis for my work, which is definitively abstract. I have sought inspiration in his world, his personality and work to obtain a specific, personal vision of it all.

    My first choice for the music was four hymns by Alfred Schnitke, both due to their intrinsic beauty, as well as due to considering them in tune with the tone of Chekhov. I also asked Pedro Alcalde and Sergio Caballero to create original music to shelter these hymns and locate them in a sound architecture to provide a backdrop to the overall ballet. To do so, they have produced a work based with words and texts taken from Chekhov’s Notebook, accompanied by non-rhythmic micro-compositions for different percussion instruments. The choreography does not use the words and texts literally, but it does always consider their extreme musical value. In their overall structuring work, they have added a Sacred Hymn by Schnitke for a capella chorus, and a small fragment with sounds from nature, although abstracted from all reference value.

    The set, designed by Jaffar Chalabi, may transport us to unending very different sceneries. We may be viewing the skyline of Moscow or the landscape of the steppes. We may imagine the roofs of the houses or also a mountain. When the structure is placed at ground level, it also allows us to remember the space and suggest more intimate ambiances, such as the room where Chekhov wrote, or even an alley from one of his tales. When the structure is raised and suspended at a certain height, we may view open spaces in nature, landscapes and woods. However, it always maintains the abstract nature that this creation has always intended.

    Another doctor and writer, Arthur Schnitzler, (a contemporary of Chekhov) defined the human soul as an “ample land”. That is the ample land that Chekhov spent his whole life observing, describing and cultivating with the care with which one cares for a garden. His clear vision of the fragile nature and complexity of human relations has reached us thanks to his work. The title, InfiniteGarden, refers to that. I also consider that the work of all great spirits is infinite, that it never ends and will never die.”
    Nacho Duato

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Jardí Tancat. nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: María del Mar Bonet
    • Set and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.) (according to the original design by Joop Caboort)
    • World premiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater 2 in Hoorn, December 19th, 1983. Premiered by Compañía  Nacional de Danza at Teatro Albéniz,  Madrid, April 3rd, 1992.

    Jardí Tancat was Nacho Duato´s first choreography. It was originally made during a workshop at Nederlands Dans Theater. Jardí Tancat - Catalonian for Closed Garden - is a collection of folk songs, based on ancient Spanish folk tales. In these songs, the Spaniards direct a supplication to God.

    Choreographer Nacho Duato has portrayed this appeal in the powerful movements of three couples, who are occupied with the sowing, planting and threshing of the barren Catalonian land. They grieve about the lack of rain but try to keep high spirits in spite of this. Desperately but proudly they continue with their work, which is translated into a dynamic and expressive, yet wonderfully naive piece of dance.

    • Gracias, Nacho 

      María del Mar Bonet 

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Hevel. Nacho Duato. Bailarines: Tamako Akiyama y Joel Toledo
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Pedro Alcalde / Sergio Caballero (original music)
    • Sets: Jaffar Chalabi 
    • Costume: Nacho Duato
    • Lighting design: Brad Fields
    • Premiere by the National Dance Company at the Sant Cugat Theatre-Auditorium (Barcelona), on 30 November 2007.

    In the ancient Hebrew poetry, the word “hevel” formed part of the repertory of images which, like “water”, “shade” or “smoke” were used to describe fragility and the ephemeral nature of the human condition. Perhaps its most notable use is to be found at the beginning of the book of the Bible usually called Ecclesiastes (Qohelet I, 2). “Hevel” became embodied in the translation of the Vulgatate as “vanitas”, and thus “vanity”. Hevel Hevelym … hakol Hevel: Vanitas vanitatum, omnia vanitas. In modern translations of the text, we find such proposals as “vacuum”, “vapour” or even “waste” (Erri De Luca: “sprecco”). From the Hebrew tradition, the Ferrara Bible (1553) translates concisely: “void of voids, absolute nothing”. Likewise, Hevel (Abel) is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered by his brother Cain. According to the biblical story, his was the first death of a human being. The meaning of the word is expressed symbolically but clearly in his name. 

    It is in its use as vanitas, as void, lapse or emptiness, that “hevel” has its meaning here.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Gnawa. Nacho Duato. Bailarina: Tereza Gonzaga
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Hassan Hakmoun/Adam Rudolph (Gift of the Gnawa, “Ma’Bud Allah”); Juan Alberto Arteche and Javier Paxariño (Finis Africae, “Carauari”); Rabih Abou-Khalil, Velez, Kusur y Sarkissian (Nafas, “Window”)
    • Costumes: Luis Devota and Modesto Lomba
    • Lighting Design: Nicolás Fischtel (A.A.I.)
    • Premiere performance by the Hubbard Street Dance Chicago at the Joan W. and Irving B. Harris Theater for Music and Dance, March 2005. Premiered by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Euskalduna, Festival Dantzaldia, Bilbao, the 4th of November 2007.

    In 1992 in his home city of Valencia, Nacho Duato premiered Mediterrania, searching deeper into his roots and those of his forebears, and his sense of complicity with the Mediterranean Sea.
    In Gnawa, premiered by the Hubbard Street Dance Chicago in 2005, the renowned choreographer has continued along the path he set out on with Mediterrania, seeking to transmit, through the medium of movement, the sensuality of the landscape, the true nature of its peoples. With a suggestive musical score replete with Spanish and North African sounds, Gnawa captivates its audience through its all-encompassing power and its sensual elegance, combining the spirituality and organic rhythm of the Mediterranean.
    Gnawa is the name that receives in Morocco and other parts of the Magreb the members of different mystic Muslim brotherhoods characterized by their sub-saharian origin and the use of song, dances and syncretic rituals as a mean to reach ecstasy. This term also refers to a musical style of sub-saharian reminiscences practised by these brotherhoods or by musicians inspired by them. It is considered one of the main Moroccan Folklore genres.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Herrumbre. Bailarina: Tereza Gonzaga
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Pedro Alcalde / Sergio Caballero (Herrumbre);
    • David Darling (Dark Wood. A series of solos for electric cello) 
    • Sets: Jaffar Chalabi 
    • Costums: Nacho Duato
    • Lights Desig: Brad Fields
    • Worldpremiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza in Gran Teatre del Liceu, Barcelona, August, 2nd 2004.
    • CHATARRA (SCRAP METAL)
    • Ángel González
    • The iron that was the shaft, the steel
    • that formed the spindles,
    • the copper that conducted the energy
    • and all the metals
    • that under bitter, angled forms, 
    • gave body to the machine’s parts,
    • that turned
    • with exact rhythm and submissive temperament,
    • with blind force and faith no less blind
    • for the benefit of man, for his hope,
    • all lie here, confused, worn out,
    • sunk in the same scorn,
    • dissolved by rust and salt, abandoned
    • by the very hand that one day gave them life.
    • Something might still be salvaged, 
    • there is still the chance
    • that a second hand may come, and, taking pity,
    • heal the rusted wounds,
    • unfurl the kiss of oil
    • over chewed upsteel skin;
    • yet everything, in general, is lost.
    • The fire
    • will even out the cogs, the rods,
    • confuse the springs and pistons,
    • return the threadbare bolts
    • to their mineral inertia and nothingness,
    • to the raw material
    • from which
    • will spring forth other forms; cleaner, purer,
    • free perhaps forever
    • from the fatal stigma of scrap metal.When the Soul Turns to Rust. 

    WITH HIS PRODUCTION HERRUMBRE (“RUST”), NACHO DUATO SEEKS TO STIR UP THE AWARENESS OF A PUBLIC WHO SEEM CLINICALLY INDIFFERENT TO THE TRUE HORROR OF TORTURE, WHICH, ALONG WITH TERRORISM AND VIOLENCE, ARE THE MODERN DAY PLAGUES FACING SOCIETY TODAY.

    Our eyes today are used to seeing the shocking images of the horrors which humanity is faced with, be they in Iraq or Guantanamo, to give just two recent examples; images which, in the words of the Spanish writer Enrique Vila-Matas, are “as old as the long night of times past”, but which appear before us in the daily newspapers alongside tempting advertisements which invite us, as members of a consumer society, to further bury ourselves under yet more frivolous purchases and consumable leisure.

    This horror has come to form a part of our normal day to day lives. On the 10th of December 1948, the General Assembly of the United Nations passed and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, thus establishing that freedom, justice and peace throughout the world are inherently based on the recognition of a series of equal and inalienable rights common to all. Conscious of the constant violation of this declaration as perpetrated by governments and leaders in the name of peace, religion, ambition or revenge, Nacho Duato has, through the medium of dance, felt the need to denounce such actions that only serve to heap shame upon humanity. “I was sick of seeing images on the television of all manner of violence and torture, and felt a growing need to translate all this terror into movement” explained Duato. “I find it repulsive to see how easily we have become accustomed to seeing such images of violence, which dominate our media to the extent that they show us upas being impassive and indifferent.” 

    Nevertheless, Duato feels that his “choreography is not only about torture, but also deals with how human beings can sink to such denigrating extremes, losing all possible dignity... In this piece I compare man to rusting iron, the very soul itself becoming scrap metal. I would like to clearly state that under no circumstances can torture ever be justifiable. Not even to save the lives of other people”. Continuing in a similar vein, he went on to say “When I try to think about what it is that drives a man to torture another, I can’t come upwith an answer; for me it’s something incomprensible, it’s easier to come to terms with the idea of a brutal murder. Herrumbre is a reflective, not a dogmatic piece of work – I’m seeking here to provoke people into meditating upon the matter. This is a situation which is repeated on a daily basis all over the world, not something a million miles away”. 

    According to Nacho Duato, in this production “the victim – tyrant relationship is expressed in a painful manner. Fear dominates the weakest element; uncertainty drives him insane as his torturer humiliates him, destroying him psychologically and physically. The whole choreography resembles a heartfelt shout; the dancers move alone in their own spaces, reflecting the loneliness of the victim, whilst at the same time I have used the chorus to express the idea of brutality. I have focused on the tortured prisoner and the prison guard; I’m not looking here at domestic violence or violence in the workplace - two areas that are currently receiving a lot of media attention and which constitute two other kinds of torture”. 

    As is typical in Nacho Duato’s work, there is an intense interchange of ideas when creating a new choreographic production, resulting in a very close and dynamic relationship with his musicians and set designers. On this occasion, Duato has chosen one of his habitual collaborators, the Iraqi set designer Jaffar Chalabi to work with him on Herrumbre, with whom he has worked before on a number of productions.“We first worked together in 1999, on Multiplicidad. Formas de Silencio y Vacío, (“Multiplicity – The Shape of Silence and Emptiness”) with music by Bach, a spectacular piece from a set design point of view, as we managed to find a perfect blend of baroque and high-tech. Jaffar has also designed the sets for four other productions of mine - Ofrenda de sombras (“Shadow Offering”), Txalaparta, Castrati and White Darkness. We have a deep mutual understanding when we work together” explained Duato.

    “With Herrumbre the choreographic vocabulary is dominated by the expressivity of gesture. Fear outlines the figures in the surrounding space, stylised like a scream which is drowned by oppression. For this piece I have chosen music by David Darling – a series of solos for electric cello taken from his album entitled Dark Wood. As the counterpoint to this music, dominated by its use of adagio, I commissioned a composition from Pedro Alcalde, with whom I have worked before on numerous occasions, and Sergio Caballero, the co-director of Barcelona’s Festival Sónar. I asked them for a score which would reflect the most brutal aspect of the subject in hand: the noise of metal on metal, of prisons, of people being hit and so on.”

     

    CNDanza- Herrumbre Nacho Duato

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Gilded Golbergs. Dancers: Tereza Gonzaga and Isaac Montllor
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Robin Holloway (for two pianos, based on Johann Sebastian Bach’s BWV 988; performed by Jennifer Micallef and Glen Inanga)
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Brad Fields
    • Worldpremiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid, November 15th, 2006.
    “Discovering Robin Holloway’s adaptation of the Goldberg Variations allowed me to get past what I had always considered as the untouchable character of Bach’s original. I finally managed to approach the written music, to work with it and thus create this performance. In any event, as I have made clear in this piece of work, adapting a masterpiece such as this might be taken as a synonym of murder, and yet it also could represent its rebirth. The work takes on a new life, a whole new dimension. What Holloway does so well is to show his courage by placing creative freedom above and beyond the burden of history”.
    Duato uses Robin Holloway’s furiously paced music to create a creative, imaginative discourse, based on an astonishing sense of musicality and the elegant performance of the Compañía Nacional de Danza’s dancers.
    Robin Holloway says of his version of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Goldberg Variations: “It seems both odd and foolish to take one of the acknowledged pinnacles of western music and recompose it. My excuses are, first, that Bach was himself an eager transcriber and transformer of other men’s music from wich he could learn; and second, that his own has been so very adaptation-friendly down the ages. There’s scarcely a subsequent composer who hasn’t imitated, arranged, orchestrated, parodied, or paid homage in one way or another. Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Wagner, Bruckner, Schumann, Liszt, Brahms, Shönberg, Webern, Elgar, Respighi, Stravinsky, Kurtag and so on – the list is endless.”
    “My own Goldberg adventure actually began with comparably modest aims. Frustrated as a single pianist by inability to clarify the close - weave canons or manage the more fiendish hand - crossing numbers so idiomatic on a two-manual harpsichord. I began to transcribe a few for the domestic medium of two pianos”. For the following five years this project took upall his time, until, by the time he had finished, he had come upwith 30 completely new Goldberg Variations.
    Born in Leamington Spa, on the 19th of October 1943, the British composer Robin Holloway, studied with Goehr (from 1960) and at Cambridge, where in 1974 he was named professor. His extensive output covers a wide range of genres (including numerous songs) and is characterised by a remarkable command of diverse styles. Some of his works seek to reinterpret Romanticism (Scenes from Schumann, for orchestra, 1970), whilst others are decidedly modernist in their approach (The Rivers of Hell for chamber ensemble, 1977). His first opera, Clarissa, a study of rape, was performed by the ENO in London in 1990.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Gavines i Dragons. Nacho Duato

    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: María del Mar Bonet
    • Sets: Walter Nobbe (Arenal) Nacho Duato (Jardí Tancat)
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Edward Effron (Arenal) Nicolás Fischtel (Jardí Tancat)
    • Arenal was World premiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater at the Muziektheater, Amsterdam, January 26th , 1988, and by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Romea, Murcia, October  6th, 1990.
      Jardí Tancat was World premiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater 2 in Hoorn, December, 19th, 1983, and by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro Albéniz ,  Madrid, April 3rd, 1992
      Gavines i Dragons was World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Festival de Vaison Le Romaine, July 16th, 1998.

    Gavines i Dragons is the result of the union of two of the most emblematic ballets of Nacho Duato’s creative origins.

    Nacho Duato explains how Bonet’s music was a great source of inspiration for his work, at a particular time. Firstly, with Jardí Tancat and, subsequently, after listening to Gavines i Dragons, with Arenal. Colour, choreography, movement, in brief; everything in both pieces is undeniably Mediterranean. 

    Jardí Tancat, Duato’s first choreographic work, is choreographed based on work songs of both land and sea labourers, in which the voice recalls both the harshness of their work and their loves. Arenal is, according to its creator, an extension of Jardí Tancat but more vital and joyful and more faithful to the songs’ internal rhythms, without abandoning the world of common people and work”.

    “I have always known that my songs were born with rhythm, but I only really became aware of it the day Nacho Duato danced to them. When I saw the first choreography, Jardí Tancat, I was quite excited. He had given them another life, they were independent and at the same time tied to me, yet they had acquired a new palpitation, they had taken a different road.

    There is something in Arenal that has always fascinated me: the treatment of the Majorcan work songs which I sing a capella. These are songs which form part of our earliest Majorcan tradition, but which are no longer sung where they come from or what they were created for, that is the work in the fields. There are hardly any places in Majorca where work in the country is still the same as forty or fifty years ago. However, when Nacho used them for his choreographies he gave them back this role of unique pieces, as if they were precious stones.

    While Jardí Tancat was so full of life, in Arenal I have been discovering an inner passion each time I sing with them. I will never tire of repeating that these choreographies of Nacho Duato have been one of the most precious artistic presents I have ever received. I believe they belong to that type of things which goes hand in hand with the most deeply felt emotions and it is hard to explain with words.

    "Thank you, Nacho”

    María del Mar Bonet

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Empty. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Izumi Kobayashi, Philip Glass, Jimi Hendrix, Peter Sculthorpe, Ravi Shankar, Istvan Marta, Camille Saint-Saëns 
    • Scenery: Nacho Duato 
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato in collaboration with Ismael Aznar 
    • Light Design: Edward Effron
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Albéniz, Madrid, April 5.

    Empty is an empty space full of forms. Against a varied musical collage, the images follow each other without apparent relation between arguments. To achieve this, a mixture of dance resourses is used in an eclectic way with the sole purpose of creating sensations. Thus, the empty space is gradually filled with images and forms, in the same way as a wall is covered with graffitis. In this ballet we become aware, in a spontaneous way, of the impact of the images through sensuality, without getting as far as understanding the reason of things: what appears as significant may well be a mere trifle, whilst small details may be replete with value.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Ecos. Nacho Duato. Dancer: Clyde Archer

    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Stephan Micus
    • Settings: Walter Nobbe
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiere by Compañía  Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela in Madrid, December 17th, 1994.

    For some time, Stephan Micus has been drawn by his fascination for the instruments of other cultures. It is not the creation of exotic sounding effects that interests him, but the challenge to discover new sounds and sound contexts. The process of coasting sounds from Elmar Daucher’s enormous blocks of cut granite and serpentine steels in combination with flute and vocal music represented an entirely new experience, if only because they are not tuned like “normal” instruments, but contain most unusual tonal intervals.

    Ecos is built upon this music, playing with different symbolic values of this curious sound material: on the one hand, the huge buildings that were built to immortalize their creators, thus highlighting their own insignificance, the fleetingness and fragility of their existences; those stones, piled uptowards height in order to be closer to God, were in the end extremely attached to earth, and in many cases, became covered by it. It also refers to the power or energy of some megalithic elements worshiped by remote or current religions: man addresses his prayers to a lifeless subject which, in this way, becomes the genesis of his spiritual life. Perishable/timeless, vain/magnificent, lifeless/alive, matter/spirit,… these dialectic binomials constitute the inspiration of the spirit of Ecos.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Duende. Nacho Duato. Bailarines: Catherine Allard y Nacho Duato
    • Choreography:Nacho Duato
    • Music:  Claude Debussy : Pastoral, first part from the Sonata for flute, viola and harp (1916). Syrinx, solo for flute (1912/1913). Final, last part from the Sonata for flute, viola and harp (1916). Danse sacrée et danse profane for harp and string orchestra (1904).
    • Sets:  Walter Nobbe
    • Costumes: Susan Unger
    • Lighting Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiere by the Nederlands Dans Theater at the AT&T Danstheater, The Hague, November  21st, 1991. Premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Lírico Nacional La Zarzuela, December 11th, 1992.

    • Duato's ‘ideas' for choreography are almost always preceded by his choice of music, which characterises his working method. Maybe this applies to Duende in particular, because the music was the only source of inspiration for this ballet. Long ago, Duato fell in love with Debussy, especially with the way the composer makes nature sound in music. When he listens to this music, Duato visualises shapes, not people, relationships or events. This is why he considers Duende as an almost sculptural work: a body, a movement, that goes with the tune.

    • Duende literally means elf or fairy, like the ones who tidy upchildren's toys at night, but it can also mean rascal, a naughty child. One can also possess ‘duende’, when radiating energy and great charm, almost having a magical attraction. In Andalusia flamenco is saidto have duende, which can hardly be translated into another language. Flamenco has a touch of spell, one might say, like the way black music has 'soul'.

    • At the beginning of the twentieth century Debussy was an unknown composer, and the public was suddenly listening to absolutely different sounds. Strange, beautiful and magical, as they must have been, these sounds have identified his complex cultural roots. Debussy’s music reveals classical and romantic origins, apart from connections with lay music, folk songs, Arab, eastern and slave cultures, and even with jazz.

    • Classicism may simply be explained as consecrated to form. In this sense, Romanticism is usually defined as the expression of emotions. However, the relationship between Debussy and these two concepts is not always so simple. Form and emotion are always present in his music, but more as the result of a process of insinuation than one of definition. In one of his rules for composers, Debussy wrote: “Discipline must be looked for in freedom”. This could be considered his first command.

    • Debussy is frequently identified with the impressionist artistic movement: but whereas painters like Monet gave great importance to light, Debussy was mainly interested in the quality and effect of sound. Comments of Debussy about Stravinsky were that “he was widening the borders of what is allowed in the empire of sound”, and this could undoubtedly be applied to his own work.

    • CND- Duende, Nacho Duato
  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Diecisiete. Bailarina: Tamako Akiyama
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Pedro Alcalde / Sergio Caballero (Diecisiete)
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Lighting Design: Brad Fields
    • World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid January 27th, 2005.

    The title refers to the number of syllables of the Japanese haikus. The music has been originally created for the piece by Pedro Alcalde and Sergio Caballero, who collaborated before with Duato in Herrumbre. 

    The haiku is probable the briefest poetic structure both in East and West. Most of the Japanese words are polysyllabic, therefore the number of them required by the haiku is relatively small: from five to eight or nine, in total. Haikus do not rhyme. The only formal requisite is to have 17 syllables. Although within a haiku there can be more than one sentence, they always content a sole poetic image. The haiku pretends to say something without saying it. What is not said communicates more than words, but has to count with them. Poetry in haiku propagates in infinite meanings because it frequently reaches that perfect simplicity pursued by philosophy, religion, literature, art and, of course, also pursued by dance.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Cor Perdut. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: María del Mar Bonet
    • Costumes and Light Design: Nacho Duato
    • World premiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater at the Nederlands Dans Theater, The Hague, April 27th, 1989.
    • Premiered by Compañía  Nacional de Danza at the Centro Cultural de la Villa,  Madrid, June 30th, 1990.

    Cor perdut is a pas de deux inspired by the Catalan version of the song Bir Demet Ysemen  by Mª del Mar Bonet. This particular interpretation is based upon a theme with traditional nuances composed by the Armenian M.J. Berberian. “It's no use crying/it’s no use dying/desire is stronger/it goes its own way”, laments the impressive voice of Mª del Mar Bonet. Her hypnotic power over Duato - who created Cor Perdut as a birthday present for the Majorcan singer - is unquestionable, considering that two of the Valencian’s most brilliant choreographies are Jardí Tancat (1983) and Arenal (1988), both to music by this interpreter. To the syncopatic and hypnotic rhythm of the Tunisian percussion instrument, the two dancers bring to life this choreographer’s dynamic corporal and expressive language with the same anxious fluency transmitted by the voice of Mª del Mar Bonet.

    Patricia García Ríos

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Concierto Madrigal. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Joaquín Rodrigo 
    • Sets: Walter Nobbe 
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Edward Effron
    • World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Romea, Murcia, October 6, 1990.
    Concierto Madrigal was the first choreography created by Nacho Duato for Compañía Nacional de Danza. The music used for this ballet is the Concierto Madrigal for two guitars and orchestra by the Spanish composer Joaquín Rodrigo. This composition has inspired Nacho Duato to make a choreographical illustration of eight of the ten short movements of which the concerto consists. As a matter of fact, Duato has followed the concerto's musical guideline to reflect, with eight pairs of dancers -distributed in pas de deux, pas de trois, solo, pas de six ..., a succession of splendid scenes within an intimist context. The dominating atmosphere of the choreography suggests landscapes which are typically Spanish. On his part, Joaquín Rodrigo has based his work on an anonymous Spanish madrigal dating back to the Renaissance period, titled Felices ojos míos. 
    The composer has made the following comment on his work: "This concerto has freed itself of the classical melodic architectures and, the established dialogue and the concerto style adopted in its composition notwithstanding, it resembles more a suite, even though the supporting element is the variation. Each of the variations or episodes are described by their respective titles, which give a score is characterized by a delicate poetical sketch. Occasionally, and due to the theme's origin, the episodes are of a modal or archaic nature; in other episodes, the melody acting as a filament all through the work is inundated by a more popular feeling". Nacho Duato's interest and tendency to use his roots is a constantly recurring feature of his work. The music, the popular feeling, the colour of the land, are values employed by Duato to establish, in his own style, a mutual relationship between all the elements, where the movement merges with the environment that has been created. In Concierto Madrigal, far from basing himself on a specific line of argument, Nacho Duato has let himself become envelopped by the colour of nature, allowing us to discover a poetical feeling: the song of the people.
  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Coming Together. Nacho Duato. Dancer: Catherine Allard
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Frederic Rzewski (Coming Together)
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiere by Compañía  Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid, December 23th, 1991.

    The turbulent repetition of musical structures and recited text from Frederic Rzewski’s frantic composition provides the accompaniment and counterpoint to an abstract work by Nacho Duato, who uses his effervescence both to bring us closer to frenzy and hysterics, and as a contrast in his creation of oniric atmospheres. Both phenomena appear alternately as well as simultaneously as could happen with the rhythms and sensations of a big city. 
    The result, of an obvious contemporary style, forces the spectator to focus his attention on the multiple changes of the choreographic process as well as on the system and structure of steps, rather than on the ordinary descriptive and narrative elements.
    Frederic Rzewski’s piece entitled Coming Together and Attica, written for narrator and instruments, to be performed ad libitum in two parts, is of crucial importance in the history of repetitive music and not only because of its obvious influence on later pieces. Here the repetitive techniques and structuring are not an end in themselves, but the means of creating a coherent musical, dramatic world. While this piece - just like Rzewski’s other works - makes use of improvisation and repetition, it is also a committed work both in the social and the political sense. Rzewski managed to combine the political, ideological meaning of the text and the musical structure into a homogeneous whole by means of an original “minimal” idea.
    The eight sentences from a letter by Sam Melville (a political prisoner killed in the 1971 Attica prison riots) are first narrated in an additive then in a deductive progression. The title of the piece is a reference to a sentence of the letter and to the technique of musical improvisation.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Cobalto. Nacho Duato. Bailarinas: Mª Luisa Arias y Tereza Gonzaga
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato 
    • Music: Pedro Alcalde / Sergio Caballero (organ player: Juan de la Rubia; Blancafort organ at the Church of Collbató)
    • Sets: Nacho Duato 
    • Costumes: Lydia Delgado
    • Lighting Design: Brad Fields
    •  
    • Absolute premiere by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro de la Zarzuela, on 20 March 2009.

    Cobalto is a reflection on erotism. Duato approaches the subject from an oneiric point of view, submerging himself in the world of erotic dreams. The piece is created for ten dancers. Once more, Duato grants the music a primordial importance in his creations and, in Cobalto, he again resorts to his usual composers, Pedro Alcalde and Sergio Caballero. Cobalto is a piece composed for a single instrument, the organ.The music was recorded at the church of Collbató on a Blancafort organ, by the organ player Juan de la Rubia.  

    Duato also has the lighting designer Brad Fields on his artistic team. He is the lighting director of the American Ballet Theater and a faithful collaborator in all his premieres for years. Another striking fist is the costume design by Lydia Delgado a fashion designer. 

    "It is like a colour (blue) an energy, but it belongs to the negative side and in its supreme purity it is, as one would say, a precious nothingness. Its effect is a mixture of excitation and serenity."

    Goethe. "Theory of colours."

    Blue is holy and pornographic, prudish and obscene. It is used in the English expression “blues”, understood as sad, but it is also like "verde", green in Spanish, means erotic or obscene. Cobalt blue is the maximum example of that bipolarity. Beautiful, arrogant and celestial, it conceals its mineral origin known as “flower of cobalt”, a mixture of cobalt arsenide and nickel that form a crystal on contact with the air. Toxic and poisonous due to its arsenic, it was christened the elf-blue that tormented miners, with the German name by which we know it: kobelt. Cobalt blue is, of all the colours, that of the unconscious history.


    Composer

    Born in Barcelona, he studied piano, flute, violin and composition in his native city, in addition to graduating in Philosophy at the University of Barcelona. He studied orchestral conducting at Columbia University of New York, where he was awarded the Master of Arts. In 1984, he was the prize winner of the international competition for orchestra conductors held at Bad-Wiessee, Germany. That same year, he conducted Stravinsky’s A Soldier’s Tale at the Horace Mann Auditorium in New York. In 1988, he obtained his Doctorate in Musicology and Philosophy at the Freie Universität of Berlin. He then studied conducting at the Hochschule für Musik of Vienna with Professor Karl Österreicher. He worked as second conductor for the Vienna Opera. In 1990, he was assistant conductor at the Vienna Philharmonic and, from 1991 to 1996 of the Berlin Philharmonic with Claudio Abbado.

    Pedro Alcalde has conducted numerous orchestras such as those of Madrid, Barcelona, Bologna, Ferrara, Rome, New York, Berlin, Frankfurt, Leipzig, Osaka, etc. In 1996, he began a series of experimental recordings at the Radio of Berlín (SFB) with the last piano sonatas by Beethoven and the last compositions for piano by Gyorgy Kurtág. He has performed works by key contemporary composers such as Sotelo, Goyette, Kurtág, Rihm or Nono. Works by Alberto Iglesias he has conducted, in addition to the ballet Self with choreography by Nacho Duato, have included the music to the film by John Malkovich, The Dancer Upstairs.

    Since 1998, he has regularly collaborated as conductor with Duato and the Compañía Nacional de Danza; as composer, he has worked with Sergio Caballero to produce the music of the choreographies for Herrumbre (2004), Diecisiete (2005), Alas (2006) and Hevel (2007). 

    Sergio Caballero

    Composer

    Born in Barcelona in 1985, he created the group Los Rinos with Marcel.lí Antúnez and Pau Nubiola, with which he performs actions, performances and theatre under a common name: the provocative, wild humour of impossible stories.

    Music and multidisciplinary artist, in 1987 he founded the musical group Jumo with Enric Les Palau, with whom he composed pieces for dance and theatre. In 1989 he produced the exhibition Sergio Caballero famous worldwide, a reflection and scepticism, on authorship of the work of art. 

    Since 1994, he has been the Co-Director of the International Festival of Advanced Music and Multimedia Art Sónar.

    Lydia Delgado

    Costume designer  

    She was born in Barcelona. Her first contacts with the world of art go back to her youthful years as a ballerina at the Gran Teatro de Opera del Liceu. She entered the fashion world after a chance meeting with the designer Antonio Miró, with whom she collaborated for some time at his creative workshop before beginning her own career. In 1989, the designer opened her own atelier at calle Minerva in the city centre, an intimate setting with its own personality and reminiscences of haute couture. A short time later, she inaugurated her shop in Barcelona, coinciding with her 1991 fashion show presentation on the Pasarela Gaudí.

    Her first collections are couture creations elaborated with patience and emotion, in which one may see a continual search for artistic expression.

    In 1997, Lydia Delgado launched her pret a porter line on the market as a more affordable proposal, although without renouncing her commitment to careful, perfectionist work. Her garments suggest daring combinations that are not lacking in irony, that seek to provoke a different way of looking at oneself and reality. 

    In 2000, Lydia presented her collection for brides, a striking, avant garde proposal, at the Royal Palace of Pedralbes. 

    A year later, Pronovias entered into a licensing agreement with Lydia Delgado for worldwide distribution of the Lydia Delgado Brides collections. 

    In 2004, Lydia Delgado inaugurated her shop in Madrid, in the central Salamanca neighbourhood.

    Lydia Delgado is now a consecrated figure on the national fashion scene. Her exclusive world has an distinguishable identity of its own, the result of personal perseverance to conserve her original values over the years: passion for quality, artistic creativity, visual strength, a weakness for details and elegance without ostentation. 

    Prizes and recognitions:

    • Marie Claire fashion prize 2007
    • Antonio Gaudi Gold Medal 2003
    • European Citizen Prize2003
    • T de Telva for the best Spanish designer 2000
    • Entrepreneurial Woman prize (FIDEM) 1999
    • Silver T de Telva 1998 

    Brad Fields

    Lighting Designer

    Born in North Carolina (USA), Brad Fields is a usual collaborator with Nacho Duato. He has created lighting designs for the Compañía Nacional de Danza to use in Alas, Arcangelo, Multiplicidad: Formas de Silencio y Vacío, Diecisiete, Sueños de Éter, Gilded Goldbergs, Herrumbre, Ofrenda de Sombras, Remanso,Without Words and Hevel. 

    He is the Lighting Director of the American Ballet Theater for which he has created, among others, the lighting designs for Coppelia, La Fille Mal Gardée, Glow-Stop and Within You Without You: a tribute to George Harrison. 

    Other past designs by him are the Don Quixote by Balanchine for the National Ballet of Canada and the Suzanne Farrel Ballet, Follia by Nicolo Fonte and Rite of Spring for the Göteborg Opera Ballet and the Bayadére by Natalia Makarova for the Australian Ballet. He has designed for the Ballet Argentina, Boston Ballet, Houston Ballet, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, Lewitzky Dance Company, Ballet de la Ópera de Lyon, Netherlands Dance Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre, San Francisco Ballet, Royal Ballet and Royal Danish Ballet.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Cero sobre Cero. Nacho Duato
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Alberto Iglesias
    • Settings: Nacho Duato
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato in collaboration with Ismael Aznar
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria, in Santander, November 17th, 1995.
    • Cero sobre cero is Nacho Duato`s latest creation and the third collaboration between this choreographer and the Basque musician Alberto Iglesias. Both Duato and Iglesiasseem to have found a way of mutual understanding in which both creators’ works go through parallel lines to finally merge, as if music and movement had always been one.

      In Cero sobre cero, ideas, words and gestures disintegrate to shape other meanings that diverge from their original intention. Duato wishes to underline the crisis which artistic values are undergoing in our society. There is also a strong intention to reflect the wild consumerism which is taking root in  society, as well as its consequences on art. Everything is disposable, nothing lasts. Only the present, immediate pleasure is important; therefore, reflection does not even take place. 

      Those are hard conditions for creative activity. This instability causes a showdown that generates violent, even destructive attitudes. However, although this could be seen as a pessimistic view of the future, it is not at all. There is still a hope of communication with that which represents purity. This may be the pillar on which to build all constructive efforts towards renewal.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    • Cautiva. Nacho Duato Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music:  Alberto Iglesias (Cautiva)
    • Sets and costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Madrid, April 12th, 1993

    Cautiva is an original piece for Compañía Nacional de Danza by its Artistic Director, Nacho Duato, with music by the Basque composer Alberto Iglesias. This passionate music inspires and gives its name to the ballet, which, in a definitely oneiric language, and through a series of confronted images, tells us the story of Cautiva. The concept is conveyed by the main female character, her doubts and her continuous  strruggle with a world of fantasy, love and death.
    “I composed Cautiva with the feeling that the main idea of the work was an emotive, irrational one, which derived in multiple meanings. Joyce´s and Pound´s texts, which I counterposed, as if they were speaking to each other from a stage for these feelings, a stage of love, not just two characters telling their stories. They glide along with the music, getting lost and meeting again constantly. The power of the unreasonable, of the dark side of reason, is something essential to music. Maybe it is there that music and dance go together and make us tremble.”
    Alberto Iglesias

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Castrati. Dancers in the stage
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Antonio Vivaldi (Nisi Dominus RV 608, Stabat Mater RV 621, Salve Regina RV 616, Concerto RV 439 “La notte”); Karl Jenkins (Palladio)
    • Sets: Jaffar Chalabi
    • Costumes: Francis Montesinos
    • Light Design: Brad Fields
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria, Santander, April 5th, 2002.

    • Just a couple of hundred years ago, sopranos were at the height of their popularity. They travelled around Europe singing opera and were considered on-stage heroes, and their art has been appreciated worldwide for centuries.

    • The last castrato died just a few decades ago, during the 20th century. The custom of castrating predates Jesus Christ, and the original motives were somewhat different. Egyptians used castration as a punishment, the Arabs used it for religious reasons, and the Turks employed it to create a groupof men with no sexual urgess to guard their harems. However, in Italy castration had a completely different purpose.

    • During the first century AD, when the apostle Saint Paul wrote: “Mulier tacet in ecclesia” (“women shall remain in silence when they are in church”), he could hardly have imagined the effect his words would have some centuries later. Choirs without female voices, composed of countertenors and pre-puberty children, worked for some time, but as musical composition demanded an ever-wider vocal range, choirs needed men with a female voice, that is to say castrated men. So, in the mid-16th century the practise of castration arrived in Europe from the East.

    • At the beginning of the 17th century, a new type of music, opera, was taking shape in Italy. For castrati this was a golden opportunity for one simple reason: women were banned from taking part. As a result, from when the first public theatre was opened in Venice in 1637 until the mid-18th century, castrati dominated the world of opera and became irreplaceable.

    • Castration produced extraordinary vocal skills and a rather peculiar colour to voices, which meant castrati were in great demand and also highly paid. Singing schools sprang upall over Italy to raise the belcanto art form to its highest possible level. Castrati were normally trained for between six and eight years at such schools, and private tutors also offered their services outside schools.

    • Castrati – (Italian Castrato) Male singers, castrated before reaching puberty in order to retain their soprano or alto voices. In this manner the childlike timbre is kept, allowing them to sing soprano in a strange manner due to the normal development of their lungs. Castrati were much more common within ecclesiastical institutions, where women were not allowed to sing, and in theatres during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. They were held in very high prestige during these times.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Scene with two dancers
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: María del Mar Bonet (Tonada de Segar, Carta a L’Exili, Tonada de Collir Olives, danza de la Primavera, Cançó de Bressol, Des de Mallorca a L’Alguer, Den Itan Nisi, Tonada  de Segar.
    • Sets: Walter Nobbe
    • Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Edward Effron
    • World premiere by  the Nederlands Dans Theater at the Muziektheatre, Amsterdam, January 26th, 1988. Premiere by Compañía  Nacional de Danza at the Teatro Romea, Murcia, October 6th, 1990.

    • Arenal is choreography by Nacho Duato, inspired by songs of María del Mar Bonet. In this ballet, the choreographer’s purpose has been to show the uninhibited cheerfulness of the Mediterranean personality contrasting with the everyday struggle of life. Duato makes this contrast very obvious. On the one hand, there is the dancing of a groupof men and women motivated by the pure joyfulness of music. Its jubilation is reflected in the clear movements of the dancers -pas de deux, pas de trois, pas de quatre- to Greek songs translated into Catalonian and Majorcan ones by María del Mar Bonet.

      On the other hand, one woman dancer stands apart, dancing alone to four songs which are performed a capella. These songs are of a realistic content and seem to arise from an agonizing outcry of the heart. The dancer’s movements are nearer to the ground than those of the others. This is to express the influence of the land. Colour, choreography, movement, everything is undeniably Mediterranean.

      Nacho Duato had worked before with María del Mar Bonet in another ballet: Jardí Tancat. “Her music constitutes an important source of inspiration for my work”, says the choreographer. “Later, while I was listening to her record Gavines i Dragons, the idea of Arenal immediately occurred to me. At once, I began to consider the possibility of María del Mar Bonet joining us to give a live performance of her songs”. Duato sees Arenalas an extension of his first work, Jardí Tancat, “though it is more vital, livelier, and more faithful to the inner rhythm of the songs themselves, without abandoning the worlds of people and of work”.

      I have always known that my songs were born with rhythm, but I only became really aware of it the day Nacho Duato danced to them. When I saw the first choreography,Jardí Tancat, I was really excited. He had given them another life. They were independent, and at the same time, still mine. Yet they had acquired a new palpitation. They had taken a different road.

      There is something in Arenal that has always fascinated me: the treatment of the Majorcan work songs which I sing a capella. These are songs which form part of our earliest Majorcan tradition, but which are no longer sung where they come from or what they were created for, that is work in the fields. There are hardly any places in Majorca where work in the country is still the same as forty or fifty years ago. However, when Nacho used the songs  for his choreographies he gave them back this role of unique pieces, as if they were precious stones.

      While Jardí Tancat, was so full of life, in Arenal I have been discovering an inner passion each time I sing with them. I will never tire of repeating that these choreographies of Nacho Duato  are one of the most precious artistic gifts I have ever received. I believe they belong to that type of thing which goes hand in hand with the most deeply felt emotions and is hard to explain in words.

      Thank you, Nacho. María del Mar Bonet

    • CNDanza Arenal - Nacho Duato
  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Bailarina: Tamako Akiyama
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Music: Arcangelo Corelli (Concerti Grossi Op. 6) and Alessandro Scarlatti (Il Primo Omicidio)
    • Sets: Nacho Duato
    • Costumes:Nacho Duato (in collaboration with Ismael Aznar)
    • Light Design: Brad Fields
    • Length: 27’ 45”
    • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro Real de Madrid, 31st May 2000.

    Arcangelo is a reflection on heaven and hell. It is based on the marvelous Concerti Grossiof the Italian Arcangelo Corelli, ending with an aria from Scarlatti’s opera Il Primo Omicidio. 

    Duato has basically employed the lentos and adagios in a different order from the original. The ballet tells us of the search for liberation through death, as a way of access to a paradise that frees us. Arcangelo Corelli began his career as a violinist at the age of seven in the Bolonia of 1670. He was recognized as an elite instrumentalist, as well as one of the most influential composers of his time. Most of his life was spent in Rome, where he died in 1713. The genere of the concerti grossi developed simultaneously in several places during the first three decades of the 17th century. At that time, the production of stage music was extremely important. Orchestras with more than a hundred musicians were commonplace. To relieve the evident lack of mobility of such numerous groups, the first performers within the string sections broke away and formed a more flexible group: the Concertino. The concerto grosso is derived from the alternation of both groups. Corelli may well be defined as the creator of the classical concerto grosso form. What particularly distinguish these concerti grossi from a string orchestra are the classical equilibrium of the baroque music, the marvelous clarity and simplicity of plot and structure, and the complete congruency of form and content.


    Compañía Nacional de Danza - Arcangelo

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Alone, For A Second. Dancer with his head covered
    • Choreography:  Nacho Duato
    • Music: Erik Satie
    • Sets and Costumes: Nacho Duato
    • Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
    • World premiered by the Nederlands Dans Theater at the AT&T Danstheater, The Hague, September, 9th, 1993. Premiered by the Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid, December, 16th, 1994.

       

    • In Alone, for a Second, Nacho Duato consciously breaks new ground in search of the still side of life, the introspective. The choreography has a cyclic structure, thus evoking the impression of a twilight state.

  • CND ARCHIVE NACHO DUATO'S REPERTOIRE 90/10

    Nacho Duato en Alas
    • Choreography: Nacho Duato
    • Theatre direction: Tomaz Pandur
    • Sets: Tomaz Pandur, Nacho Duato. Made by: Odeón.
    • Music: Pedro Alcalde/Sergio Caballero (original music); Arvo Pärt, Jules Massenet, Pawel Szymanski and Fuckhead (collage)
    • Costumes: Angelina Atlagic
    • Light Design: Brad Fields
    • Video: Zeljko Serdarevic and Dragan Mileusnic
    • Texts: Fragments of the cinematographic script of the movie Der Himmel überBerlin (Win Wenders/ Peter Handke), selected by Tomaz Pandur
    • Voice: Ana Wagener
    • World premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Palacio de Festivales de Cantabria (Santander), April 28th 2006.

    Alas (Wings) means the first collaboration between Duato and the Slovene theatre director Tomaz Pandur. For his text, Pandur chooses short fragments of Peter Handke’s script for Wim Wenders’ film Wings of Desire (1987). Nevertheless, Duato´s choreography doesn’t offer a parallelism with the movie in explicit sense. Both artists collaboration suppose the incursion of the interpreters of the CND in more dramatics areas. Nacho Duato himself dances andrecites a series of monologues during his performance. 

    Tomaz Pandur made himself known in Spain with Sherezada in 1990, and last year he set Infierno with Centro Dramático Nacional. Considered one of the most internationally renowned scenic contemporary creators, his works usually show an original managing of the scenographic skill to the service of irreproachable dramatic interpretations giving place to images of overwhelming beauty.

    This production will count with original music composed by Pedro Alcalde and Sergio Caballero. Both of them composed previous works for Compañía Nacional de Danza: Herrumbre (2004) and Diecisiete (2005). Likewise, Duato will use music of Arvo Pärt, Jules Massenet and Pawel Szymanski. On the other hand, Duato will count with one of his most faithful and successful collaborators since years: Brad Fields, who will take care of the light design of this ambitious project.

 

GUESS CHOREOGRAPHERS