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SALON DE PROVENCE PROGRAM

Compañía Nacional de Danza

Poster

Suite No.2 Op. 17, III: Romance

Choreography: Uwe Scholz
Music: Sergei Rachmaninov
Costumes: Uwe Scholz
Light Design: Röger Michael Wolfgang
Costumes made by: Klaus Schreck
Duration: 9 minutes (aprox.)

World premiere by Zürich Ballet on 1987 at Zürich Opera House, Zürich (Switzerland)
Premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza on May 8th, 2015 at Teatro Principal, Valencia (Spain).

What distinguishes Scholz choreographies in general is their unparalleled musically. Pace by pace the music resounding with his work seems to articulate itself almost perforce in harmony with his art. Whereas one normally hopes to perceive the choreography to reflect the music, to translate it faithfully into the visual setting, with Scholz artistically unequalled tour de force, to stage, on the contrary, reflects the music mirror-like in resounding symphonic imagery.
Scholz writes poetry with movement. He writes poetry in dance. His ballets, written in largely classical moves, are a silent address to stage: emphatically tracing everyman’s joys, everyman’s joys, everyman’s sorrows. It is that affects everyone anew in his work. You hear his ballets with your eyes. You see them with your ears.

-Klaus Geitel-

Uwe Scholz

Uwe Scholz was born on 31 December 1958 in the state of Hesse, Germany.
He received his first ballet training at the age of four, which was then continued two years later at the Landestheater Darmstadt. In 1973, under the tuition of John Cranko, he passed the entrance exam at the Ballet School of the Wuerttembergische Staatstheater Stuttgart, where he completed his training in 1979. Upon concluding his studies, he was given a contract, as a member of the Stuttgart Ballet, where he was entrusted by Marcia Haydée with a number of choreographic challenges. These were to have lasting effect and influence on his further development. In 1980, Uwe Scholz received a choreographer’s contract from Haydée and retired as a dancer from the stage. Two years later, he was appointed the first "Resident Choreographer" of the Stuttgart Ballet since John Cranko's death.
In addition to choreographing ballets, he was also able to gather experience as an assistant producer and opera choreographer (e.g. with Lovro von Matacic and with Hans Neuenfels, "Aida" in Frankfurt on Main), as an opera director (e.g. Testimonium Festival in Israel and "The Magic Flute" in Nuremberg), and as a drama assistant (with Heyme) and on work for television. At the age of only twenty-six, Uwe Scholz became the Ballet Director and Resident Choreographer of the Zurich Opera House, where he directed the Zurich Ballet for six years until 1991.
Since 1991, Uwe Scholz has been the Director and Resident Choreographer of the Leipzig Opera Ballet. Here he took on the artistic management of a ballet ensemble which was amongst the largest in Germany and has been known internationally since 1992 as the Leipzig Ballet. During his long career as a choreographer, he created a repertoire of more than seventy ballets. Without omitting such renowned composers as Mozart, Wagner and Stravinsky, his musical range extended from music of the renaissance period to collaborating with contemporary composers such as Udo Zimmermann or Pierre Boulez.
Uwe Scholz's talents as a choreographer are in demand world-wide. He has choreographed ballets for the Vienna State Opera, La Scala Milan, on several occasions for the Stuttgart Ballet, for "Les Ballets de Monte Carlo" as well as Jiri Kylan’s "Nederlands Dans Theater", for Jerusalem, Stockholm and Toronto.
Uwe Scholz's choreographic signature has made a name for itself on many international stages (including New York, Paris, Moscow, Rio de Janeiro, Madrid, Florence, Tokyo, Berlin and Munich).  For his services as a choreographer, Uwe Scholz was awarded the "Ommagio Alla Danza" award by the "Espressione Europa" organisation in Venice in 1987.  In 1996, the German President of the time, Roman Herzog, bestowed upon him the Order of the Federal Republic of Germany. In honour of his choreography of Mozart’s 1st Mass in D minor, which enjoyed its premiere in February 1998 with the Leipzig Ballet, he received the Theatre Award of the year, from the Bavarian National Government in the Dance category. He was also awarded the German Dance Award in Essen in 1999. Uwe Scholz's vision of the ideal interpretation of dance was not limited to a mere achievement of perfection in terms of dance. Instead he was interested in the dancer’s ability to convey an artistic idea through "body language". Uwe Scholz was a founding member of the Freie Akademie der Kuenste zu Leipzig. In 1993, he was appointed Professor for Choreography at the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy College for Music and Theatre in Leipzig. Since September 1997, he was also the Director of the Ballet School of the Leipzig Opera. Uwe Scholz died at the age of 45 years on the November 21st, 2004. 

Don Quixote Suite

  • Foto: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines: Cristina Casa y Anthony Pina
  • Foto de grupo de toreros: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarina: Aída Badía
  • Foto de grupo: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarinas: Haruhi Otani y Lucie Barthélémy
  • Foto: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines: Cristina Casa y Anthony Pina

  • Foto de grupo de toreros: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarina: Aída Badía

  • Foto de grupo: Jesús Vallinas

  • Foto: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarinas: Haruhi Otani y Lucie Barthélémy


  • Choreography: José Carlos Martínez (inspired on the versions of Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorski).
  • Music:: Ludwig Minkus.
  • Costumes and readaptation of wardrobe: Carmen Granell.
  • Duration: 40 min.
  • World Premiere by the Spanish National Dance Company, on 14th February 2015, at the Víctor Villegas Auditorium in Murcia with the Region of Murcia Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Gonzalo Berná.

Together with Swan Lake, the Ballet Don Quixote, by Marius Petipa, was one of the most popular ballets in Russia, where it was premiered in 1869 to a musical score by Ludwig Minkus. This colourful work broke away from the eerie world of supernatural or fairylike creatures of the classical 19th century ballets and brought ordinary people to the stage.

The libretto is based on an episode of the second volume of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes (chapter XXI, “Continuing with the wedding of Camacho and other fine events …”), and the action focuses on the troublesome love between Quiteria and Basilio rather than on the adventures of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza.

The ballet was passed on from one generation to the next uninterruptedly in Russia thanks to tradition and successive revisions, the most important of these being done by Alexander Gorski in 1900.

Many choreographers have created their own versions of this great classic, for instance those of Rudolf Nureyev for the Vienna State Opera and Mikhail Baryshnikov for the American Ballet Theatre.

In his Suite of Don Quixote (with extracts from the original acts one and four), José Carlos Martínez focuses further on the characters of Quiteria and Basilio, using the corps de ballet to add to the dynamic action of this timeless classic with a Spanish flavour.

 

Minus 16

Choreography: Ohad Naharin
Music: Collage (*)
Costumes: Ohad Naharin
Light design: Avi Yona Bueno (Bambi)
Staging: Shani Garfinkel and Shahar Biniamini
Duration: 32 minutes

World premiere by Batsheva Dance Company on 1999 at Lucent Dance Theater, The Hague (The Netherlands).
Premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza on November 16th, 2013 at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid (Spain).

Featuring an eclectic score ranging from Dean Martin to mambo, techno to traditional Israeli music, Ohad Naharin’s Minus 16 uses improvisation and Naharin’s acclaimed Gaga method, a unique movement language that breaks down old habits, pushing the dancers to challenge themselves in new ways.
 The work is unique for removing the barrier between performers and spectators. Minus 16 not only delights in its own wackiness, but also celebrates the joy of dancing. The piece has elements of unpredictability and fun that makes each performance of Minus 16 delightfully different.

* Music
It Must Be True performed by The John Buzon Trio. Written by Gus Arnheim, Harry Barris and Gordon Clifford. Used by permission with EMI Mills Music Inc.
Hava Nagila ©1963, ren. 1991 Surf Beat Music. All rights reserved. Written and arranged by Dick Dale under license from Surf Beat Music (ASCAP).
Echad Mi Yode’a Lyrics and Music Traditional. Arranged by The Tractor’s Revenge (Green, Belleli, Leibovitch). Published by The Tractor’s Revenge (Green, Belleli, Leibovitch).
Nisi Dominus, RV 608: IV. Cum Dederit (Andante) by Antonio Vivaldi performed by James Bowman, The Academy of Ancient Music and Christopher Hogwood.
Over The Rainbow by E.Y. ‘YIP’ Harburg and Harold Arlen. Used by permission of EMI Feist Catalog Inc. One Hundred Percent (100%) ASCAP.
Hooray For Hollywood (Richard Whiting and Johnny Mercer) ©1937 (Renewed) WB Music Corp. (ASCAP) All rights reserved. Used by permission. Written by John Mercer and Richard Whiting. Used by permission with Warner/Chappell Music.
Sway by Pablo Beltran Ruiz, Luis Demetrio, Traconis Molina, and Norman Gimbel; Words West LLC d/b/a Butterfield Music (BMI). All rights reserved.


Ohad Naharin

Ohad Naharin has been hailed as one of the world’s preeminent contemporary choreographers. As Artistic Director of Batsheva Dance Company since 1990, he has guided the company with an adventurous artistic vision and reinvigorated its repertory with his captivating choreography. Naharin is also the originator of an innovative movement language, Gaga, which has enriched his extraordinary movement invention, revolutionized the company’s training, and emerged as a growing force in the larger field of movement practices for both dancers and non-dancers.
Born in 1952 on Kibbutz Mizra, Ohad Naharin began his dance training with the Batsheva Dance Company in 1974. During his first year with the company, visiting choreographer Martha Graham singled out Naharin for his talent and invited him to join her own company in New York. While in New York, Naharin studied on a scholarship from America-Israel Cultural Foundation at the School of American Ballet, furthered his training at The Juilliard School, and polished his technique with master teachers Maggie Black and David Howard. He went on to perform internationally with Israel’s Bat-Dor Dance Company and Maurice Béjart’s Ballet du XXe Siècle in Brussels.

 

LINKS TO PICTURES:

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28045 Madrid

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VALENCIA PROGRAM

Compañía Nacional de Danza

In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated. William Forsythe

  • Teatro Principal
  • May 8 and 9, 2015
  • Program:
  • ALLEGRO BRILLANTE. George Balanchine/ Piotr Ilich Chaikovski
  • SUITE NO.2 OP. 17, III: ROMANCE. Uwe Scholz/Sergei Rachmaninov
  • RAYMONDA VARIATIONS. José Carlos Martínez/ Alexander Gluzanov
  • IN THE MIDDLE, SOMEWHAT ELEVATED. William Forsythe / Thom Willems
  • New window. Dossier
  • Compañía Nacional de Danza

Compañía Nacional de Danza was founded in 1979 under the name of The Ballet Nacional de España Clásico, its first Director being Victor Ullate. His successors in the post were María de Avila and the extraordinary Russian ballerina Maya Plisétskaya, until, in 1990, Nacho Duato was named Artistic Director of the company.
Nacho Duato’s appointment brought innovative change to the history of the company. Until 2010, he contributed forty five works as a choreographer, praised by critics worldwide.
After one year under the direction of Hervé Palito, José Carlos Martinez was appointed as the new Director of the Compañía Nacional de Danza. The Principal Dancer from the Paris Opera Ballet took office on September 1st, 2011.
The project José Carlos Martinez has for the Compañía Nacional de Danza is to encourage and make the art of dance more well known, along with his repertory in the ample sense, ranging from classical and neoclassical ballet to modern choreographic language, embracing both new Spanish and international creation, drawing in new audiences and boosting its national and international projection within a setting of full artistic and creational freedom.

José Carlos Martínez

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF COMPAÑÍA NACIONAL DE DANZA de España                      
COMMANDEUR DE L'ORDRE DES ARTS ET DES LETTRES (France)                                           
PREMIO NACIONAL DE DANZA 1999 (Spain)

José Carlos Martínez. Foto QuezadaJosé Carlos Martínez began his ballet studies in Cartagena, under Pilar Molina, continuing in 1984 at the Centre de Danse International Rosella Hightower in Cannes. In 1987, he won the Lausanne Prize and joined the Paris Opera Ballet School. In 1988, he was personally selected by Rudolf Nureyev to join the Ballet Company of the Paris Opera as a corps de ballet dancer. In 1992, he was promoted to Principal Dancer and won the Gold Medal in the International Competition of Varna. On 27th May 1997, he was appointed “Etoile” of Paris Opera Ballet, the highest category a dancer can rise to.
During his career José Carlos Martínez was awarded numerous prizes such as the Prix de l ‘AROP, the Prix Carpeaux, the Premio Danza & Danza, the Prix Léonide Massine-Positano, the Spanish National Dance Prize, the Gold Medal of the City of Cartagena, the Prize Elegance et Talent France/Chine, Scenic Arts Prize for the best dancer (Valencia), Benois de la Danse for his choreography Les Enfants du Paradis, Prize Dansa València. He is Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (France).
Jose Carlos Martinez's repertoire as a dancer is characterized by the famous choreographies of classical and neo-classical ballet. Apart from that he has worked with most of the important choreographers of the 20th Century such as Maurice Bejart, Pina Bausch, Mats Ek, William Forsythe, many of them creating on him.
As a guest he has performed with many of the world's most prestigious ballet companies.
As a choreographer José Carlos Martínez created Mi Favorita (2002), Delibes Suite (2003), Scaramouche (2005) for students of the Paris Opera Ballet School, Paréntesis 1 (2005), Soli-Ter (2006), El Olor de la Ausencia (2007), Les Enfants du Paradis (2008) for Paris Opera Ballet, Ouverture en Deux mouvements and Scarlatti pas de deux (2009), Marco Polo, the Last Mission (2010) for Shanghai Ballet. For Compañía Nacional de Danza de España he has created Sonatas (2012), Raymonda Variations, Giselle pas de deux (2013) and Resonance (2014) for the Boston Ballet. In 2015 he stages his own version of Don Quixote Suite announcing the complete ballet premiere by the CND in December of the same year.
José Carlos Martínez has been the new Artistic Director of Spain's Compañía Nacional de Danza de España since September 2011.

Allegro Brillante

Choreography: George Balanchine (© The George Balanchine Trust)

Music: Piotr Ilich Chaikovski, (Concierto de piano no 3, op. 75)
Costumes: Nanette Glushak y Miguel Crespi
Staging: Nanette Glushak
Adaptation of Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
Costumes made by: Miguel Crespi
Duration: 17 minutes

Worldpremiere by New York City Ballet on March 1st, 1956 at the City Center of Music and Drama, New York.
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza May 24th, 2014 at Teatro Real de Madrid.

Allegro Brillante is characterized by what Maria Tallchief (the ballerina on whom the bravura leading role was created) calls “an expansive Russian romanticism.” The music’s vigorous pace makes the steps appear even more difficult, but the ballet relies on strong dancing, precise timing, and breadth of gesture. Balanchine said: “It contains everything I know about the classical ballet in 13 minutes.” Tschaikovsky’s Third Piano Concerto was originally written as a symphony. But as it was nearing completion, the composer, dissatisfied with it, converted the first movement into a concert piece for piano.
The performance of Allegro Brillante, a Ballanchine® Ballet, is presented by arrangement with The George Balanchine Trust and has been produced in accordance with the Balanchine Style® and Balanchine Technique® Service standards established and provided by the Trust.

George Balanchine

George Balanchine was born in St. Petersburg, Russia (1904-1983) and is regarded as the foremost contemporary choreographer in the world of ballet. He came to the United States in late 1933, at the age of 29, accepting the invitation of the young American arts patron Lincoln Kirstein (1907-96), whose great passions included the dream of creating a ballet company in America. At Balanchine's behest, Kirstein was also prepared to support the formation of an American academy of ballet that would eventually rival the long-established schools of Europe.
Balanchine's more than 400 dance works include Serenade (1934), Concerto Barocco (1941), Le Palais de Cristal, later renamed Symphony in C (1947), Orpheus (1948), The Nutcracker (1954), Agon (1957), Symphony in Three Movements (1972), Stravinsky Violin Concerto (1972), Vienna Waltzes (1977), Ballo della Regina (1978), and Mozartiana (1981). His final ballet, a new version of Stravinsky's Variations for Orchestra, was created in 1982.
He also choreographed for films, operas, revues, and musicals. Among his best-known dances for the stage is Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, originally created for Broadway's On Your Toes (1936). The musical was later made into a movie.
A major artistic figure of the twentieth century, Balanchine revolutionized the look of classical ballet. Taking classicism as his base, he heightened, quickened, expanded, streamlined, and even inverted the fundamentals of the 400-year-old language of academic dance. This had an inestimable influence on the growth of dance in America. Although at first his style seemed particularly suited to the energy and speed of American dancers, especially those he trained, his ballets are now performed by all the major classical ballet companies throughout the world.

Suite No.2 Op. 17, III: Romance

Choreography: Uwe Scholz
Music: Sergei Rachmaninov
Costumes: Uwe Scholz
Light Design: Röger Michael Wolfgang
Costumes made by: Klaus Schreck
Duration: 9 minutes (aprox.)

World premiere by Zürich Ballet on 1987 at Zürich Opera House, Zürich (Switzerland)
Premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza on May 8th, 2015 at Teatro Principal, Valencia (Spain).

What distinguishes Scholz choreographies in general is their unparalleled musically. Pace by pace the music resounding with his work seems to articulate itself almost perforce in harmony with his art. Whereas one normally hopes to perceive the choreography to reflect the music, to translate it faithfully into the visual setting, with Scholz artistically unequalled tour de force, to stage, on the contrary, reflects the music mirror-like in resounding symphonic imagery.
Scholz writes poetry with movement. He writes poetry in dance. His ballets, written in largely classical moves, are a silent address to stage: emphatically tracing everyman’s joys, everyman’s joys, everyman’s sorrows. It is that affects everyone anew in his work. You hear his ballets with your eyes. You see them with your ears.

-Klaus Geitel-

Uwe Scholz

Uwe Scholz was born on 31 December 1958 in the state of Hesse, Germany.
He received his first ballet training at the age of four, which was then continued two years later at the Landestheater Darmstadt. In 1973, under the tuition of John Cranko, he passed the entrance exam at the Ballet School of the Wuerttembergische Staatstheater Stuttgart, where he completed his training in 1979. Upon concluding his studies, he was given a contract, as a member of the Stuttgart Ballet, where he was entrusted by Marcia Haydée with a number of choreographic challenges. These were to have lasting effect and influence on his further development. In 1980, Uwe Scholz received a choreographer’s contract from Haydée and retired as a dancer from the stage. Two years later, he was appointed the first "Resident Choreographer" of the Stuttgart Ballet since John Cranko's death.
In addition to choreographing ballets, he was also able to gather experience as an assistant producer and opera choreographer (e.g. with Lovro von Matacic and with Hans Neuenfels, "Aida" in Frankfurt on Main), as an opera director (e.g. Testimonium Festival in Israel and "The Magic Flute" in Nuremberg), and as a drama assistant (with Heyme) and on work for television. At the age of only twenty-six, Uwe Scholz became the Ballet Director and Resident Choreographer of the Zurich Opera House, where he directed the Zurich Ballet for six years until 1991.
Since 1991, Uwe Scholz has been the Director and Resident Choreographer of the Leipzig Opera Ballet. Here he took on the artistic management of a ballet ensemble which was amongst the largest in Germany and has been known internationally since 1992 as the Leipzig Ballet. During his long career as a choreographer, he created a repertoire of more than seventy ballets. Without omitting such renowned composers as Mozart, Wagner and Stravinsky, his musical range extended from music of the renaissance period to collaborating with contemporary composers such as Udo Zimmermann or Pierre Boulez.
Uwe Scholz's talents as a choreographer are in demand world-wide. He has choreographed ballets for the Vienna State Opera, La Scala Milan, on several occasions for the Stuttgart Ballet, for "Les Ballets de Monte Carlo" as well as Jiri Kylan’s "Nederlands Dans Theater", for Jerusalem, Stockholm and Toronto.
Uwe Scholz's choreographic signature has made a name for itself on many international stages (including New York, Paris, Moscow, Rio de Janeiro, Madrid, Florence, Tokyo, Berlin and Munich).  For his services as a choreographer, Uwe Scholz was awarded the "Ommagio Alla Danza" award by the "Espressione Europa" organisation in Venice in 1987.  In 1996, the German President of the time, Roman Herzog, bestowed upon him the Order of the Federal Republic of Germany. In honour of his choreography of Mozart’s 1st Mass in D minor, which enjoyed its premiere in February 1998 with the Leipzig Ballet, he received the Theatre Award of the year, from the Bavarian National Government in the Dance category. He was also awarded the German Dance Award in Essen in 1999. Uwe Scholz's vision of the ideal interpretation of dance was not limited to a mere achievement of perfection in terms of dance. Instead he was interested in the dancer’s ability to convey an artistic idea through "body language". Uwe Scholz was a founding member of the Freie Akademie der Kuenste zu Leipzig. In 1993, he was appointed Professor for Choreography at the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy College for Music and Theatre in Leipzig. Since September 1997, he was also the Director of the Ballet School of the Leipzig Opera. Uwe Scholz died at the age of 45 years on the November 21st, 2004. 

Raymonda Variations

  • Choreography: José Carlos Martinez (to the original by Marius Petipa and the version by Rudolf Nureyev)
  • Music: Alexander Glazunov.
  • Costumes: Jordi Roig and Carmen Granell
  • Duration: 28 minutes
  • Worldpremiere by Ballet Imperial in January 19th 1898 at Marinsky Theatre, St. Petersburgo.
  • Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza in October 18th 2013 at Teatro Guerra de Lorca.

The ballet Raymonda (one of the last great works by Marius Petipa) takes place in three acts in a conventional Middle Ages. This “Gran Pas Classique” is an extract from the Act III: Raymonda and Jean de Brienne, are now married in the presence of the King of Hungary.
Just as the music takes on the exotic tones of Magyar themes, the classic steps are also adorned with Hungarian taste. While the legs dance in pure classic style the bust and arms adopts the gestures of a “character dance”

*Dedicated to Maya Plisétskaya
José Carlos Martinez
Nueva ventana. Álbum CND Flickr

In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated

Choreography: William Forsythe
Music: Thom Willems
Sets, Costumes and Light Design: William Forsythe
Staging: Agnès Noltenius
Costumes made by: Klaus Schreck
Duration: 28 minutes

Worldpremiere by Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris at Théâtre National de l’Opéra de París, May 29, 1987
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela Madrid, December 11, 1992.

The strength of a work is based on its simplicity. In The Middle, lacking in any external effects, is concentrated on thetraditional formula, theme and variations. The main theme, danced by the ballerina, increases progressively in relationto the number of dancers, until the result of the group becomes much more complex variations and pas de deux. The pretended disdain of the dancers contrasts with the strict and severe technical demands. The title of the ballet refers to two golden cherries, which hang above from the centre of the stage, and which lead to a minimal reflexion within the huge interior of l’Opéra de Paris, the space in which this ballet was created

William Forsythe

Raised in New York and initially trained in Florida with Nolan Dingman and Christa Long, Forsythe danced with the Joffrey Ballet and later the Stuttgart Ballet, where he was appointed Resident Choreographer in 1976. Over the next seven years, he created new works for the Stuttgart ensemble and ballet companies in Munich, The Hague, London, Basel, Berlin, Frankfurt am Main, Paris, New York, and San Francisco. In 1984, he began a 20-year tenure as director of the Ballet Frankfurt, where he created works such as Artifact (1984), Impressing the Czar (1988), Limb’s Theorem (1990), The Loss of Small Detail (1991, in collaboration with composer Thom Willems and designer Issey Miyake), A L I E / N A(C)TION (1992), Eidos:Telos (1995), Endless House (1999), Kammer/Kammer (2000), and Decreation (2003).
After the closure of the Ballet Frankfurt in 2004, Forsythe established a new, more independent ensemble. The Forsythe Company, founded with the support of the states of Saxony and Hesse, the cities of Dresden and Frankfurt am Main, and private sponsors, is based in Dresden and Frankfurt am Main and maintains an extensive international touring schedule. Works produced by the new ensemble include Three Atmospheric Studies (2005), You made me a monster (2005), Human Writes (2005), Heterotopia (2006), The Defenders (2007), Yes we can’t (2008), and I Don’t Believe in Outer Space (2008). Forsythe’s most recent works are developed and performed exclusively by The Forsythe Company, while his earlier pieces are prominently featured in the repertoire of virtually every major ballet company in the world, including The Kirov Ballet, The New York City Ballet, The San Francisco Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada, England’s Royal Ballet, and The Paris Opera Ballet.
Awards received by Forsythe and his ensembles include the New York Dance and Performance “Bessie” Award (1988, 1998, 2004, 2007) and London’s Laurence Olivier Award (1992, 1999, 2009). Forsythe has been conveyed the title of Commandeur des Arts et Lettres (1999) by the government of France and has received the German Distinguished Service Cross (1997), the Wexner Prize (2002) and the Golden Lion (2010).
Forsythe has been commissioned to produce architectural and performance installations by architect-artist Daniel Libeskind, ARTANGEL (London), Creative Time (New York), and the City of Paris. His installation and film works have been presented in numerous museums and exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (New York), the Venice Biennale, the Louvre Museum, and 21_21 Design Sight in Tokyo. His performance, film, and installation works have been featured at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich, the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, the Venice Biennale and the Hayward Gallery, London.
In collaboration with media specialists and educators, Forsythe has developed new approaches to dance documentation, research, and education. His 1994 computer application Improvisation Technologies: A Tool for the Analytical Dance Eye, developed with the Zentrum für Kunst und Medien technologie, is used as a teaching tool by professional companies, dance conservatories, universities, postgraduate architecture programs, and secondary schools worldwide. 2009 marks the launch of Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced, a digital online score developed with The Ohio State University that reveals the organizational principles of the choreography and demonstrates their possible application within other disciplines.
As an educator, Forsythe is regularly invited to lecture and give workshops at universities and cultural institutions. In 2002, Forsythe was chosen as one the founding Dance Mentor for The Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative. Forsythe is an Honorary Fellow at the Laban Centre for Movement and Dance in London and holds an Honorary Doctorate from the Juilliard School in New York.



 
 


VALLADOLID PROGRAM

Compañía Nacional de Danza

In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated. William Forsythe

New window. Dossier

VALLADOLID. Teatro Calderón

May 29th  - 31th , 2015
29th and 30th (20:30 hs.)
31th (19:30 hs.)

CLASSICS OF TODAY (… from Petipa to Forsythe)

Program:
Allegro Brillante. George Balanchine/ Piotr Ilich Chaikovski (Concierto de piano nº 3, op. 75)
Delibes Suite. José Carlos Martínez/ Leo Delibes
Raymonda Variations. José Carlos Martínez/ Alexander Gluzanov
In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated. William Forsythe / Thom Willems

Clara Blanco dances in Valladolid

With the special collaboration of the guest artist Clara Blanco, soloist from San Francisco Ballet.

"For me, dancing in Valladolid is one of my greatest joys and desires. It is true, that thanks to my long career with San Francisco Ballet, I have danced in many beautiful stages all over the world, but there is nothing like dancing in my hometown. It makes me especially happy doing it with the CND which many times I have admired and I've been proud of for representing my country. To dance at Teatro Calderón surrounded by my family and all those friends who once knew the enthusiasm and the desire of a little girl to achieve the dream of dancing at the biggest stages of the world as a professional dancer, it is something very special and emotional for me." -Clara Blanco-

Allegro Brillante

  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas.  Bailarines/Dancers: Noëllie Conjeaud, Esteban Berlanga, Erez Ilan, Eugenia Brezzi, Alvaro Madrigal, Natalia Muñoz
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas.  Bailarines/Dancers: Alvaro Madrigal, Toby William Mallitt, Eugenia Brezzi, Lucie Barthélémy, Esteban Berlanga, Nandita Shankardass, Natalia Muñoz, Erez Ilan, Jacopo Giarda
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Noëllie Conjeaud, Esteban Berlanga, Erez Ilan, Eugenia Brezzi, Alvaro Madrigal, Natalia Muñoz
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Alvaro Madrigal, Toby William Mallitt, Eugenia Brezzi, Lucie Barthélémy, Esteban Berlanga, Nandita Shankardass, Natalia Muñoz, Erez Ilan, Jacopo Giarda

 

Choreography: George Balanchine (© The George Balanchine Trust)
Music: Piotr Ilich Chaikovski, (Concierto de piano no 3, op. 75)
Costumes: Nanette Glushak y Miguel Crespi
Staging: Nanette Glushak
Adaptation of Light Design: Nicolás Fischtel
Costumes made by: Miguel Crespi
Duration: 17 minutes

Worldpremiere by New York City Ballet on March 1st, 1956 at the City Center of Music and Drama, New York.
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza May 24th, 2014 at Teatro Real de Madrid.

Allegro Brillante is characterized by what Maria Tallchief (the ballerina on whom the bravura leading role was created) calls “an expansive Russian romanticism.” The music’s vigorous pace makes the steps appear even more difficult, but the ballet relies on strong dancing, precise timing, and breadth of gesture. Balanchine said: “It contains everything I know about the classical ballet in 13 minutes.” Tschaikovsky’s Third Piano Concerto was originally written as a symphony. But as it was nearing completion, the composer, dissatisfied with it, converted the first movement into a concert piece for piano.
The performance of Allegro Brillante, a Ballanchine® Ballet, is presented by arrangement with The George Balanchine Trust and has been produced in accordance with the Balanchine Style® and Balanchine Technique® Service standards established and provided by the Trust.

George Balanchine

George Balanchine was born in St. Petersburg, Russia (1904-1983) and is regarded as the foremost contemporary choreographer in the world of ballet. He came to the United States in late 1933, at the age of 29, accepting the invitation of the young American arts patron Lincoln Kirstein (1907-96), whose great passions included the dream of creating a ballet company in America. At Balanchine's behest, Kirstein was also prepared to support the formation of an American academy of ballet that would eventually rival the long-established schools of Europe.
Balanchine's more than 400 dance works include Serenade (1934), Concerto Barocco (1941), Le Palais de Cristal, later renamed Symphony in C (1947), Orpheus (1948), The Nutcracker (1954), Agon (1957), Symphony in Three Movements (1972), Stravinsky Violin Concerto (1972), Vienna Waltzes (1977), Ballo della Regina (1978), and Mozartiana (1981). His final ballet, a new version of Stravinsky's Variations for Orchestra, was created in 1982.
He also choreographed for films, operas, revues, and musicals. Among his best-known dances for the stage is Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, originally created for Broadway's On Your Toes (1936). The musical was later made into a movie.
A major artistic figure of the twentieth century, Balanchine revolutionized the look of classical ballet. Taking classicism as his base, he heightened, quickened, expanded, streamlined, and even inverted the fundamentals of the 400-year-old language of academic dance. This had an inestimable influence on the growth of dance in America. Although at first his style seemed particularly suited to the energy and speed of American dancers, especially those he trained, his ballets are now performed by all the major classical ballet companies throughout the world. 

Delibes Suite

  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarina/Dancer: YaeGee Park
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Aitor Arrieta, YaeGee Park
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Aitor Arrieta
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarina/Dancer: YaeGee Park
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Aitor Arrieta, YaeGee Park
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Aitor Arrieta

 

Choreography: José Carlos Martínez
Music: Leo Delibes
Extracts from "La Source" (scene and "Pas d'Action" from the 2nd Act, Suite No. 3) and from "Coppelia" (the Work and the "Galop final" of the 2nd Act)
Costumes: Agnès Letestu
Light Design: José Carlos Martínez
Costumes made by: Carmen Granell and CND Wardrobe
Duration: 13 minutes

Worldpremiere by Incidence choregraphique on 16th March 2003 at L'Orangerie de Roissy, France.
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza on 18th October 2013 at Teatro Guerra, Lorca.

Regarding the music by the French composer, Leo Delibes (several extracts from "La Source" and "Coppelia"), José Martínez has choreographed a Pas de deux in the classical tradition - adagio, dancer's variation, ballerina's variation, coda, in which he enjoys himself by quoting the choreographic arsenal of more complex pieces, while he does provide aprecise, subtle lightness that mixes with the vitality that characterises him. 

Raymonda Variations

  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Giulia Paris, Erez Ilan
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: CND
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: CND
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarina/Dancer: Lucie Barthélémy
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Giulia Paris, Erez Ilan
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: CND
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: CND
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarina/Dancer: Lucie Barthélémy

 

Choreography: José Carlos Martinez (to the original by Marius Petipa and the version by Rudolf Nureyev)
Music: Alexander Glazunov.
Costumes: Jordi Roig and Carmen Granell
Duration: 28 minutes

Worldpremiere by Ballet Imperial in January 19th 1898 at Marinsky Theatre, St. Petersburgo.
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza in October 18th 2013 at Teatro Guerra de Lorca.

The ballet Raymonda (one of the last great works by Marius Petipa) takes place in three acts in a conventional Middle Ages. This “Gran Pas Classique” is an extract from the Act III: Raymonda and Jean de Brienne, are now married in the presence of the King of Hungary.
Just as the music takes on the exotic tones of Magyar themes, the classic steps are also adorned with Hungarian taste. While the legs dance in pure classic style the bust and arms adopts the gestures of a “character dance”

*Dedicated to Maya Plisétskaya
José Carlos Martinez
Nueva ventana. Álbum CND Flickr

In The Middle, Somewhat Elevated

  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: YaeGee Park, Toby William Mallitt
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: YaeGee Park, Toby William Mallitt
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Grupo CND/CND Group
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Grupo CND/CND Group
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: YaeGee Park, Toby William Mallitt

Choreography: William Forsythe
Music: Thom Willems
Sets, Costumes and Light Design: William Forsythe
Staging: Agnès Noltenius
Costumes made by: Klaus Schreck
Duration: 28 minutes

Worldpremiere by Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris at Théâtre National de l’Opéra de París, May 29, 1987.
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela Madrid, December 11, 1992.

The strength of a work is based on its simplicity. In The Middle, lacking in any external effects, is concentrated on thetraditional formula, theme and variations. The main theme, danced by the ballerina, increases progressively in relationto the number of dancers, until the result of the group becomes much more complex variations and pas de deux. The pretended disdain of the dancers contrasts with the strict and severe technical demands. The title of the ballet refers to two golden cherries, which hang above from the centre of the stage, and which lead to a minimal reflexion within the huge interior of l’Opéra de Paris, the space in which this ballet was created.

William Forsythe

Raised in New York and initially trained in Florida with Nolan Dingman and Christa Long, Forsythe danced with the Joffrey Ballet and later the Stuttgart Ballet, where he was appointed Resident Choreographer in 1976. Over the next seven years, he created new works for the Stuttgart ensemble and ballet companies in Munich, The Hague, London, Basel, Berlin, Frankfurt am Main, Paris, New York, and San Francisco. In 1984, he began a 20-year tenure as director of the Ballet Frankfurt, where he created works such as Artifact (1984), Impressing the Czar (1988), Limb’s Theorem (1990), The Loss of Small Detail (1991, in collaboration with composer Thom Willems and designer Issey Miyake), A L I E / N A(C)TION (1992), Eidos:Telos (1995), Endless House (1999), Kammer/Kammer (2000), and Decreation (2003).
After the closure of the Ballet Frankfurt in 2004, Forsythe established a new, more independent ensemble. The Forsythe Company, founded with the support of the states of Saxony and Hesse, the cities of Dresden and Frankfurt am Main, and private sponsors, is based in Dresden and Frankfurt am Main and maintains an extensive international touring schedule. Works produced by the new ensemble include Three Atmospheric Studies (2005), You made me a monster (2005), Human Writes (2005), Heterotopia (2006), The Defenders (2007), Yes we can’t (2008), and I Don’t Believe in Outer Space (2008). Forsythe’s most recent works are developed and performed exclusively by The Forsythe Company, while his earlier pieces are prominently featured in the repertoire of virtually every major ballet company in the world, including The Kirov Ballet, The New York City Ballet, The San Francisco Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada, England’s Royal Ballet, and The Paris Opera Ballet.
Awards received by Forsythe and his ensembles include the New York Dance and Performance “Bessie” Award (1988, 1998, 2004, 2007) and London’s Laurence Olivier Award (1992, 1999, 2009). Forsythe has been conveyed the title of Commandeur des Arts et Lettres (1999) by the government of France and has received the German Distinguished Service Cross (1997), the Wexner Prize (2002) and the Golden Lion (2010).
Forsythe has been commissioned to produce architectural and performance installations by architect-artist Daniel Libeskind, ARTANGEL (London), Creative Time (New York), and the City of Paris. His installation and film works have been presented in numerous museums and exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (New York), the Venice Biennale, the Louvre Museum, and 21_21 Design Sight in Tokyo. His performance, film, and installation works have been featured at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich, the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, the Venice Biennale and the Hayward Gallery, London.
In collaboration with media specialists and educators, Forsythe has developed new approaches to dance documentation, research, and education. His 1994 computer application Improvisation Technologies: A Tool for the Analytical Dance Eye, developed with the Zentrum für Kunst und Medien technologie, is used as a teaching tool by professional companies, dance conservatories, universities, postgraduate architecture programs, and secondary schools worldwide. 2009 marks the launch of Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced, a digital online score developed with The Ohio State University that reveals the organizational principles of the choreography and demonstrates their possible application within other disciplines.
As an educator, Forsythe is regularly invited to lecture and give workshops at universities and cultural institutions. In 2002, Forsythe was chosen as one the founding Dance Mentor for The Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative. Forsythe is an Honorary Fellow at the Laban Centre for Movement and Dance in London and holds an Honorary Doctorate from the Juilliard School in New York.

Clara Blanco -Guest Dancer-

"For me, dancing in Valladolid is one of my greatest joys and desires. It is true, that thanks to my long career with San Francisco Ballet, I have danced in many beautiful stages all over the world, but there is nothing like dancing in my hometown. It makes me especially happy doing it with the CND which many times I have admired and I've been proud of for representing my country. To dance at Teatro Calderón surrounded by my family and all those friends who once knew the enthusiasm and the desire of a little girl to achieve the dream of dancing at the biggest stages of the world as a professional dancer, it is something very special and emotional for me." -Clara Blanco-

Born in Valladolid, Spain, Clara Blanco trained at Estudio de Beatriz Martin, Estudio de Danza de Maria Avila, and San Francisco Ballet School. She joined the Company in 2001, performed with Birmingham Royal Ballet for one year in 2006, and returned to SF Ballet in 2007.
Blanco has danced principal roles in Tomasson’s Nutcracker(Grand Pas de Deux Ballerina); Balanchine’s Symphony in Three Movements; Cranko’s Onegin (Olga); Page’s Guide to Strange Places; Possokhov’s Classical Symphony and Fusion; and Wheeldon’s Cinderella (Stepsister Clementine), Number Nine, and Rush. She has danced featured roles in Tomasson’s Giselle (Zulma) and Swan Lake (pas de trois); Tomasson/Possokhov’s Don Quixote (Cupid); Balanchine’s Coppélia, “Emeralds,” The Four Temperaments, Scotch Symphony, Symphony in C, and Symphony in Three Movements; Caniparoli’s Ibsen’s House (Mrs. Alving); Fokine’s Petrouchka (Ballerina); Lifar’s Suite en Blanc; Makarova’s Paquita; Nureyev’s Raymonda—Act III; Possokhov’s The Rite of Spring; Ratmansky’s Le Carnaval des Animaux; Welch’s Naked; and Wheeldon’s Carousel (A Dance).
Her repertory also includes Tomasson’s Romeo & Juliet, The Sleeping Beauty, 7 for Eight, Chi-Lin, “Haffner” Symphony, On a Theme of Paganini, Prism, and Trio; Balanchine’s Ballo Della Regina, “Rubies,” Serenade, Square Dance, Stars and Stripes, Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Theme and Variations, and Who Cares?; Bournonville’s The Flower Festival in Genzano pas de deux; Kudelka’s Dreams of Harmony; MacMillan’s Elite Syncopations; Neumeier’s The Little Mermaid; Robbins’ Glass Pieces, Opus 19/The Dreamer, and West Side Story Suite; Possokhov’s Diving into the Lilacs, Firebird, and Reflections; Ratmansky’s Le Carnaval des Animaux; Welch’s Tu Tu; and Wheeldon’s Ghosts, There Where She Loved, and Within the Golden Hour.
As a guest artist, Blanco danced Wheeldon’s After the Rain pas de deux at Gala de Danza in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, in 2013; Sugar Plum Fairy in Nutcracker at Emerald Ballet Theatre in Bellevue, Washington, and at BRAVA ARTS in Riverside, California, in 2012; After the Rain pas de deux at Dancing Through Generations Gala at Brandon Ballet, Tampa, Florida, in 2012; Grand Pas Classique and After the Rain at “Ballet Stars From San Francisco,” Lively Arts Foundation Gala, Fresno, California, in 2012; pas de deux from Nutcracker and After the Rain at the Pas de Deux Gala in Valladolid, Spain, in 2012; and pas de deux from Paquitaand Wheeldon’s Continuum at the 6th International Competition for the Erik Bruhn Prize in Toronto, Canada, in 2002.
Blanco was named ambassador of Vallalodid’s Teatro Calderón in June 2012.

TOLEDO PROGRAM

Compañía Nacional de Danza

in the middle somewhat elevated william forsythe fotos jesus vallinas cnd 1

Teatro de Rojas

May 15 and 16, 2015 (20:00 hs.)

Program:

DON QUIXOTE SUITE. José Carlos Martínez/ Ludwig Minkus
-Intermission-
SUITE N0.2 OP. 17 , III: ROMANCE. Uwe Scholz/Sergei Rachmaninov
IN THE MIDDLE, SOMEWHAT ELEVATED. William Forsythe / Thom Willems
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Don Quixote. José Carlos Martínez

  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarina/Dancer: Giada Rossi
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarina/Dancer: Haruhi Otani
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarines/Dancers: Alina Cojocaru & Alessandro Riga
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarín/Dancer: Yanier Gómez
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarina/Dancer: Seh Yun Kim
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarines/Dancers: Cristina Casa & Jose Antonio Beriguistain
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarín/Dancer: Anthony PIna
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel.
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarines/Dancers: Cristina Casa & Yanier Gómez
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarina/Dancer: Giada Rossi
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarina/Dancer: Haruhi Otani
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarines/Dancers: Alina Cojocaru & Alessandro Riga
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarín/Dancer: Yanier Gómez
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada. Bailarina/Dancer: Seh Yun Kim
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarín/Dancer: Anthony PIna/span>
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel
  • Foto/Picture: Alba Muriel. Bailarines/Dancers: Cristina Casa & Yanier Gómez

Choreography: José Carlos Martínez (inspired on the versions of Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorski).
Music: Ludwig Minkus
Set design: Ricardo Sánchez Cuerda
Costumes made by Pedro Moreno
Conductor: Kevin Rhodes

World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza on December 17th, 2015 at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid (Spain).

Basilio loved Quiteria from his earliest years, and she responded to his passion with countless modest proofs of affection, so that the loves of the two children, Basilio and Quiteria, were the talk and the amusement of the town. As they grew up, the father of Quiteria made up his mind to refuse Basilio his wonted freedom of access to the house, and to relieve himself of constant doubts and suspicions, he arranged a match for his daughter with the rich Camacho, as he did not approve of marrying her to Basilio, who had not so large a share of the gifts of fortune as of nature; for if the truth be told ungrudgingly, he is the most agile youth we know, a mighty thrower of the bar, a first-rate wrestler, and a great ball-player; he runs like a deer, and leaps better than a goat, bowls over the nine-pins as if by magic, sings like a lark, plays the guitar so as to make it speak, and, above all, handles a sword as well as the best.

- For that excellence alone -said Don Quixote at this-, the youth deserves to marry, not merely the fair Quiteria, but Queen Guinevere herself, were she alive now, in spite of Launcelot and all who would try to prevent it.

- Say that to my wife! -said Sancho, who had until now listened in silence-, for she won't hear of anything but each one marrying his equal, holding with the proverb 'each ewe to her like'. What I would like is that this good Basilio, for I am beginning to take a fancy to him already, should marry this lady Quiteria; and a blessing and good luck, I meant to say the opposite, on people who would prevent those who love one another from marrying.

Miguel de Cervantes
Don Quijote de la Mancha, II -XIX

Suite No.2 Op. 17, III: Romance

  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: José Jordan. Bailarines/Dancers: Seh Yun Kim, Alessandro Riga, Esteban Berlanga

Choreography: Uwe Scholz
Music: Sergei Rachmaninov
Costumes: Uwe Scholz
Light Design: Röger Michael Wolfgang
Costumes made by: Klaus Schreck
Duration: 9 minutes (aprox.)

World premiere by Zürich Ballet on 1987 at Zürich Opera House, Zürich (Switzerland)
Premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza on May 8th, 2015 at Teatro Principal, Valencia (Spain).

What distinguishes Scholz choreographies in general is their unparalleled musically. Pace by pace the music resounding with his work seems to articulate itself almost perforce in harmony with his art. Whereas one normally hopes to perceive the choreography to reflect the music, to translate it faithfully into the visual setting, with Scholz artistically unequalled tour de force, to stage, on the contrary, reflects the music mirror-like in resounding symphonic imagery.
Scholz writes poetry with movement. He writes poetry in dance. His ballets, written in largely classical moves, are a silent address to stage: emphatically tracing everyman’s joys, everyman’s joys, everyman’s sorrows. It is that affects everyone anew in his work. You hear his ballets with your eyes. You see them with your ears.

-Klaus Geitel-

Uwe Scholz

Uwe Scholz was born on 31 December 1958 in the state of Hesse, Germany.
He received his first ballet training at the age of four, which was then continued two years later at the Landestheater Darmstadt. In 1973, under the tuition of John Cranko, he passed the entrance exam at the Ballet School of the Wuerttembergische Staatstheater Stuttgart, where he completed his training in 1979. Upon concluding his studies, he was given a contract, as a member of the Stuttgart Ballet, where he was entrusted by Marcia Haydée with a number of choreographic challenges. These were to have lasting effect and influence on his further development. In 1980, Uwe Scholz received a choreographer’s contract from Haydée and retired as a dancer from the stage. Two years later, he was appointed the first "Resident Choreographer" of the Stuttgart Ballet since John Cranko's death.
In addition to choreographing ballets, he was also able to gather experience as an assistant producer and opera choreographer (e.g. with Lovro von Matacic and with Hans Neuenfels, "Aida" in Frankfurt on Main), as an opera director (e.g. Testimonium Festival in Israel and "The Magic Flute" in Nuremberg), and as a drama assistant (with Heyme) and on work for television. At the age of only twenty-six, Uwe Scholz became the Ballet Director and Resident Choreographer of the Zurich Opera House, where he directed the Zurich Ballet for six years until 1991.
Since 1991, Uwe Scholz has been the Director and Resident Choreographer of the Leipzig Opera Ballet. Here he took on the artistic management of a ballet ensemble which was amongst the largest in Germany and has been known internationally since 1992 as the Leipzig Ballet. During his long career as a choreographer, he created a repertoire of more than seventy ballets. Without omitting such renowned composers as Mozart, Wagner and Stravinsky, his musical range extended from music of the renaissance period to collaborating with contemporary composers such as Udo Zimmermann or Pierre Boulez.
Uwe Scholz's talents as a choreographer are in demand world-wide. He has choreographed ballets for the Vienna State Opera, La Scala Milan, on several occasions for the Stuttgart Ballet, for "Les Ballets de Monte Carlo" as well as Jiri Kylan’s "Nederlands Dans Theater", for Jerusalem, Stockholm and Toronto.
Uwe Scholz's choreographic signature has made a name for itself on many international stages (including New York, Paris, Moscow, Rio de Janeiro, Madrid, Florence, Tokyo, Berlin and Munich).  For his services as a choreographer, Uwe Scholz was awarded the "Ommagio Alla Danza" award by the "Espressione Europa" organisation in Venice in 1987.  In 1996, the German President of the time, Roman Herzog, bestowed upon him the Order of the Federal Republic of Germany. In honour of his choreography of Mozart’s 1st Mass in D minor, which enjoyed its premiere in February 1998 with the Leipzig Ballet, he received the Theatre Award of the year, from the Bavarian National Government in the Dance category. He was also awarded the German Dance Award in Essen in 1999. Uwe Scholz's vision of the ideal interpretation of dance was not limited to a mere achievement of perfection in terms of dance. Instead he was interested in the dancer’s ability to convey an artistic idea through "body language". Uwe Scholz was a founding member of the Freie Akademie der Kuenste zu Leipzig. In 1993, he was appointed Professor for Choreography at the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy College for Music and Theatre in Leipzig. Since September 1997, he was also the Director of the Ballet School of the Leipzig Opera. Uwe Scholz died at the age of 45 years on the November 21st, 2004. 

In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated. William Forsythe

  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: YaeGee Park, Toby William Mallitt
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: YaeGee Park, Toby William Mallitt
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Grupo CND/CND Group
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Grupo CND/CND Group
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Aurélia Bellet, Esteban Berlanga
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: YaeGee Park, Toby William Mallitt

Choreography: William Forsythe
Music: Thom Willems
Sets, Costumes and Light Design: William Forsythe
Staging: Agnès Noltenius
Costumes made by: Klaus Schreck
Duration: 28 minutes

Worldpremiere by Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris at Théâtre National de l’Opéra de París, May 29, 1987
Premiered by Compañía Nacional de Danza at Teatro de la Zarzuela Madrid, December 11, 1992.

The strength of a work is based on its simplicity. In The Middle, lacking in any external effects, is concentrated on thetraditional formula, theme and variations. The main theme, danced by the ballerina, increases progressively in relationto the number of dancers, until the result of the group becomes much more complex variations and pas de deux. The pretended disdain of the dancers contrasts with the strict and severe technical demands. The title of the ballet refers to two golden cherries, which hang above from the centre of the stage, and which lead to a minimal reflexion within the huge interior of l’Opéra de Paris, the space in which this ballet was created

William Forsythe

Raised in New York and initially trained in Florida with Nolan Dingman and Christa Long, Forsythe danced with the Joffrey Ballet and later the Stuttgart Ballet, where he was appointed Resident Choreographer in 1976. Over the next seven years, he created new works for the Stuttgart ensemble and ballet companies in Munich, The Hague, London, Basel, Berlin, Frankfurt am Main, Paris, New York, and San Francisco. In 1984, he began a 20-year tenure as director of the Ballet Frankfurt, where he created works such as Artifact (1984), Impressing the Czar (1988), Limb’s Theorem (1990), The Loss of Small Detail (1991, in collaboration with composer Thom Willems and designer Issey Miyake), A L I E / N A(C)TION (1992), Eidos:Telos (1995), Endless House (1999), Kammer/Kammer (2000), and Decreation (2003).
After the closure of the Ballet Frankfurt in 2004, Forsythe established a new, more independent ensemble. The Forsythe Company, founded with the support of the states of Saxony and Hesse, the cities of Dresden and Frankfurt am Main, and private sponsors, is based in Dresden and Frankfurt am Main and maintains an extensive international touring schedule. Works produced by the new ensemble include Three Atmospheric Studies (2005), You made me a monster (2005), Human Writes (2005), Heterotopia (2006), The Defenders (2007), Yes we can’t (2008), and I Don’t Believe in Outer Space (2008). Forsythe’s most recent works are developed and performed exclusively by The Forsythe Company, while his earlier pieces are prominently featured in the repertoire of virtually every major ballet company in the world, including The Kirov Ballet, The New York City Ballet, The San Francisco Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada, England’s Royal Ballet, and The Paris Opera Ballet.
Awards received by Forsythe and his ensembles include the New York Dance and Performance “Bessie” Award (1988, 1998, 2004, 2007) and London’s Laurence Olivier Award (1992, 1999, 2009). Forsythe has been conveyed the title of Commandeur des Arts et Lettres (1999) by the government of France and has received the German Distinguished Service Cross (1997), the Wexner Prize (2002) and the Golden Lion (2010).
Forsythe has been commissioned to produce architectural and performance installations by architect-artist Daniel Libeskind, ARTANGEL (London), Creative Time (New York), and the City of Paris. His installation and film works have been presented in numerous museums and exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (New York), the Venice Biennale, the Louvre Museum, and 21_21 Design Sight in Tokyo. His performance, film, and installation works have been featured at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich, the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, the Venice Biennale and the Hayward Gallery, London.
In collaboration with media specialists and educators, Forsythe has developed new approaches to dance documentation, research, and education. His 1994 computer application Improvisation Technologies: A Tool for the Analytical Dance Eye, developed with the Zentrum für Kunst und Medien technologie, is used as a teaching tool by professional companies, dance conservatories, universities, postgraduate architecture programs, and secondary schools worldwide. 2009 marks the launch of Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced, a digital online score developed with The Ohio State University that reveals the organizational principles of the choreography and demonstrates their possible application within other disciplines.
As an educator, Forsythe is regularly invited to lecture and give workshops at universities and cultural institutions. In 2002, Forsythe was chosen as one the founding Dance Mentor for The Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative. Forsythe is an Honorary Fellow at the Laban Centre for Movement and Dance in London and holds an Honorary Doctorate from the Juilliard School in New York.

COMPAÑÍA NACIONAL DE DANZA
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CARMEN PROGRAM

Compañía Nacional de Danza

 

  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Kayoko Everhart & Isaac Montllor
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada
  • Foto/Picture: Jesús Vallinas. Bailarines/Dancers: Kayoko Everhart & Isaac Montllor
  • Foto/Picture: Carlos Quezada

CARMEN 

  • Direction and choreography : Johan Inger
  • Music: Rodion Shchedrin and Georges Bizet
  • Additional original music: Marc Álvarez
  • Original editor of Carmen Suite, Bizet-Shchedrin: Musikverlag Hans Sikorski, Hamburg
  • Dramaturgy: Gregor Acuña-Pohl
  • Set design: Curt Allen Wilmer (AAPEE)
  • Assistant set designer: Isabel Ferrández Barrios
  • Lighting design: Tom Visser
  • Costumes made by: David Delfín
  • Assistant to the choreographer: Urtzi Aranburu
  • Duration: 1 h. 30 min. (Ballet in two acts)
  • World premiere by Compañía Nacional de Danza on April 9th, 2015 at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid (Spain).

When Johan Inger was asked to create a new version of Carmen, being himself Swedish and Carmen a piece with a strong Spanish nature, he faced an enormous challenge but also a great opportunity. His approach to this universal myth would have to bring something new. For this, Inger decided to focus on the violence as a matter, approaching to it through a pure view, not contaminated... as a child. Beginning at this point, Inger creates a character that encourages us to be witnesses of all that passed through its innocent eyes, while we contemplate its own transformation.
"There is a certain mistery within this character, it could be any kid, it could be Don José when he was a boy, it could be a young Michaela or Carmen and José unborned child. It could be even ourselves, with our very first goodness wounded due to a violent experience that, though brief, has had a negative impact in our lives and our ability to interact with others forever."

 -Johan Inger-

Choreography

  • Alternativa accesible al vídeo
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  • Logo CND. 35 aniversario. Compañía Nacional de Danza. José Carlos Martínez
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  • presenta
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  • Fundido de negro a imagen de una bailarina con pantalones cortos (que representa a una niña) con un balón que cruza la escena de derecha a izquierda en plano medio abierto, lleva un balón bajo el brazo. Título de la coreografía en rojo: Carmen
  • 0:00:16.000,0:00:20.200
  • Plano general, la bailarina se gira de espaldas y se va hacia el fondo. Aparecen nuevos créditos: Dirección y Coreografía Johan Inger. La bailarina continúa avanzando hacia un muro con un espacio abierto y puertas a las bandas donde arroja el balón.
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  • Corte a un plano general en el que un hombre vestido de traje gris con una media en la cabeza avanza de izquierda a derecha sobre la parte del muro con todas las puertas cerradas.
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  • Otra vez vemos a la bailarina con la pelota frente al muro, ligeramente girada y parece mirar hacia el hombre que se acerca.
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  • por sorpresa desde la banda derecha y con la bailarina mirando hacia la derecha, el personaje, que parece simbolizar una asechanza, para una mano extendida y el brazo sobre la cabeza de la bailarina y la obliga a inclinarse hacia atrás hasta que se cae
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  • La coge de los pies y la gira 180º
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  • Otra vez la niña estática de pies y de espaldas al espectador sobre un fondo negro
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  • Correrías de un grupo de muchachos vestidos con pantalones cortos y de pronto todos miran hacia la puerta abierta de donde sale una bailarina, Carmen y otro grupo de bailarinas tras de ella.
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  • Vemos a Carmen vestida con un traje corto rojo de volantes acercarse hacia el espectador con movimientos ondulantes de cadera muy insinuantes. Los chicos juegan con ella cruzándose a su paso con deseos de seducirla.
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  • Todos los personajes de agrupan en la parte izquierda del escenario y en un plano general muy abierto, se ven a lo lejos, en la puerta abierta a Carmen con un hombre trajeado de gris, Don José.
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  • La escena se aproxima y muestra a Don José de pies, mirando a lo alto, de donde caen flores amarilla, luego se le ve sentado entre las flores con las piernas levantadas. Luego de pies, con una flor amarilla sujeta junto a cuello haciendo movimientos convulsos.
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  • La niña de espaldas y él detenido frente a ella con las flores en las manos
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  • La niña de espaldas empuja el muro alejándolo hacia el fondo, pero en el siguiente plano el muro continúa y parece moverse solo mientras ella mira extrañada desde la banda derecha de la escena.
  • 0:01:02.100,0:01:11.200
  • Aparece una escena del grupo de bailarinas con faldas cortas de volantes de oscuras y sujetador visto, están peleando entre ellas. Tras varios juegos compositivos una es empujada por Carmen hasta caer al suelo y la música se detiene.
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  • Se levanta y la pelea continua con movimientos muy originales por parte del grupo y las dos bailarinas enfrentadas hasta que carmen la arroja al suelo por segunda vez con un corte sangrante en la cara.
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  • Aparecen Carmen y Don José en un forcejeo, ella se insinúa sexualmente abriendo las piernas, más tarde contorsionándose hacia atrás entre un juego de espejos que la refleja varias veces.
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  • El juego de espejos aporta dramatismo a la escena en que ambos se relacionan con varios pasos y juegos visuales y una música que parece presagiar que algo malo va a suceder. La expresión de Don José denota cierta desesperación unida a su fuerte deseo por esta mujer.
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  • Don José, de uniforme, está sujeto por los brazos por dos personajes vestidos con camisas blancas y otro oficial vestido de gris que parece arrancarle galones u otros objetos no expresos en la escena.
  • 0:02:03.300,0:02:06.100
  • El grupo de bailarines y bailarinas can cruzando la escena, parecen querer avisar a Carmen de algún peligro.
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  • Don José muestra un impulso incontenible de avance mientras dos personajes le detienen sujetándole por los brazos y haciéndole girar.
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  • Sobre un escenario oscurecido y con el reflejo del juego de espejos, corren todos los personajes, parecen desconcertados. Se ve a Carmen del brazo de otro hombre y a Don José agarrándola por el brazo para separarla de él y lanzando al hombre al suelo
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  • Don José solo desde la banda derecha apunta con una pistola y el brazo muy estirado y dispara.
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  • Una música tétrica y un grupo de bailarines con medias en la cabeza, que parecen emisarios de la muerte recogen al hombre muerto ante el estupor de carmen que mira atónita la escena.
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  • La niña en el margen izquierdo se echa las manos a la cabeza, dos José en la banda derecha simula que corre, se enfoca de nuevo a la niña en un plano más detallado.
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  • Ahora, plano a plano, con espectacular expresividad y un dramatismo creciente, se intercalan escenas que muestran la zozobra emocional de Don José, está bailando con los personajes de la media en la cabeza, ahora parecen los remordimientos. Mientras tanto, Carmen se divierte con un torero vestido con traje de luces negro y su grupo de amistades con escenas impregnadas de sexualidad entre el juego de reflejos de los espejos.
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  • Se ve a Don José alzando a la bailarina en el mismo escenario, al fondo la niña mira vestida de negro, se ve un fuerte forcejeo lleno de violencia por parte de Don José hacia Carmen.
  • 0:03:13.200,0:03:20.100
  • Corren los personajes grises con al media en la cabeza, puertas iluminadas giran en el escenario haciendo un círculo, se ven personajes en tierra, Don José y Carmen se acercan desde el fondo cogidos de la mano.
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  • Los personajes grises se apuñalan entre ellos anticipando un desenlace fatal.
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  • De nuevo Carmen y Don José, esta vez él la abraza y besa en el cuello contra el deseo de ella hasta que finalmente la apuñala y se corta la escena y la música de un gran dramatismo.
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  • Pantalla a negro y luego, con música de campanas, se ven los iconos de las redes sociales de la CND, facebook, twitter, vimeo y twitter y la url de la página web, cndanza.mcu.es.
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  • Larga secuencia de créditos con bailarines y equipo de realización.
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  • Logo Loewe Foundation, Gobierno de España, Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte e Inaem.

Staging

The staging for this new proposal for Carmen is conceptually based on the creation of an open, plain scenario, with simple, clear-cut shapes and visually wholesome materials. An association of atmospheres is sought by reinterpreting the original novel, avoiding any form of localised aesthetic approach. Seville can be any place, a tobacco factory is any industry and the mountains of Ronda represent a frame of mind on the edge, which transposed to the stage is reflected as shady, dark, concealed, unsafe quarters. To create this atmosphere, three materials are used for the scenography—concrete, a mirror and a black undulated material, and a form rises: an equilateral triangle that instinctively and by association represents the universe depicted in Carmen. Three are a crowd, three stir up jealousy, three, alas, flow into violence.

Three times three equals nine prisms.
The scenography synthetically consists of three moving prisms, each with three different sides, moved by three dancers via the choreography, which is used to articulate the different spaces. These clear spaces do not hinder the dancing, highlighting possible places and moods just by their form and the material from which they are made.
The floor changes throughout the performance, starting out light and ending darker. Lamps accompany three different moments: the factory, the fiesta and the mountains. Aside from the costumes, this will be the only touch of colour in the scenography.
This scenography is meant to appear dynamic and functional, at the service of a proposal that will show us, from the viewpoint of a child, the multiple aspects of this universal work of art, among which are violence and its consequences.

-Curt Allen-
Scenography

Costume design

Carmen. Johan Inger, wardrobe skectchThe guidelines set by the director of this ballet were sobriety, timelessness, contemporariness and a subtle proximity with the 1960s. All of the foregoing is to be viewed from the standpoint of symbol and metaphor. The personality of the characters will be tinged by these concepts. The idea is to create a new Carmen, removed from stereotype and from the period that we normally associated with the story, unfolding and transferring the characters to their contemporary equivalents.
In this way, soldiers will be transposed to an aesthetically different form of power—that of corporate executives. The matador, a key figure, will resemble a film or rock star …
This symbolism is reinforced by metaphoric characters. The gipsies, seduced by the charms of the women rolling tobacco leaves that arouse their animal instincts, almost become dogs in heat. The candour, purity, goodness and the mystery to be found in humankind is represented by a boy, an androgynous presence that grows darker as the work proceeds forward. The violence and frustration is transformed into shadows, characters that gain presence in the second part of the ballet. The characters are sophisticated during the party in act one, whereas the cleaning woman brings us down to earth later on…
And then, of course, we have Carmen. Some of the notes from Johan’s analysis: A free, brave, contemporary soul, perhaps an apocalyptic character. The costumes must convey strength and identity, with a slight touch of aesthetic ambiguity.
The first part will be bright and colourful. Act Two becomes darker, with greys and blacks taking the stage. The fabrics will be chosen taking into consideration their maintenance and preservation, they will be easy to wash and iron. We shall especially combine cotton and polyester with a small percentage of elastane.
This starting point for the creation of the wardrobe for this ballet, as in any creative process, will be altered and transformed according to the progress and requirements arising in the construction of Carmen. 

-David Delfín-
Costume design

Johan Inger

The Swede Johan Inger (Stockholm, 1967) completed his dance training at the Royal Swedish Ballet School and at the National Ballet School in Canada. From 1985 to 1990 he danced with the Swedish Royal Ballet in Stockholm, the last year performing as a soloist. Fascinated by the works of Kylián, Inger was convinced that a next step in his dance career should take him to Nederlands Dans Theater. In 1990 he joined Nederlands Dans Theater I and was a high-profile dancer in this company until 2002. When Inger tried his hand at Nederlands Dans Theater’s annual Choreography Workshops (entitled Switch), Jiří Kylián noticed his talent for choreography. After four workshop pieces, Inger was allowed in 1995 to make his first choreography for Nederlands Dans Theater II. The resulting Mellantid marked his official debut as a choreographer. It was part of the Holland Dance Festival and was immediately a resounding success. It brought him the Philip Morris Finest Selection Award 1996 in the Contemporary Dance category. In 2001 Mellantid was nominated for the Laurence Olivier Award in the Best New Dance Production category.
Since his debut, Inger has made various works for Nederlands Dans Theater (like Sammanfall, Couple of Moments, Round Corners, Out of breath). For his ballets Dream Play and Walking Mad he received the Lucas Hoving Production Award in October 2001. Walking Mad- as it was later performed by Cullberg Ballet -was awarded the Danza & Danza’s Award 2005. Inger himself was nominated with Dutch prizes such as the Golden Theatre Dance Prize 2000 by the VSCD Dance Panel and the Merit Award 2002 from the Stichting Dansersfonds ’79. In 2013, Johan received the prestigious Carina Ari Award in Stockholm for his worldwide promotion of Swedish art and dance.
Inger left Nederlands Dans Theater to take on the artistic leadership of Cullberg Ballet in Stockholm in 2003. Over the past years he has made various choreographies for this company: Home and Home, Phases, In Two, Within Now, As if, Negro con Flores and Blanco amongst others. And to celebrate Cullberg Ballet’s 40th anniversary, he created the work Point of eclipse (2007). From the summer of 2008 Inger ended his artistic directorship so as to devote himself entirely to choreography. In February 2009 he produced a new work for Cullberg Ballet entitled, Position of Elsewhere. In October 2009, Inger created dissolve in this for Nederlands Dans Theater I & II to celebrate the 50th jubilee season of the company. Since 2009, Johan Inger holds the  position as Associate Choreographer with Nederlands Dans Theater, creating for the companies regularly. In May 2010, the Göteborg Ballet in Sweden premièred Falter and in September 2010, Nederlands Dans Theater I premièred Tone Bone Kone, both were new creations. In 2011, Inger created the successful Rain Dogs, based on music by Tom Waits, for the Basel Ballett in Switzerland. In 2012, Inger made, I New Then, for Nederlands Dans Theater 2 and in 2013, Sunset Logic, for the Nederlands Dans Theater 1 in The Hague, the Netherlands. In September 2013 he created Tempus Fugit for Basel Ballet in Switzerland. His latest creation, B.R.I.S.A., was created in 2014 for Nederlands Dans Theater 2. Inger is presently working on two full-evening creations for the Compaňia Nacional de Danza in Madrid and the Royal Swedish Ballet in Stockholm.

  • November 2014  
  • Johan Inger ha sido galardonado con el Benois de la Danse 2016 por su coreografía Carmen, originalmente creada par la CND.
  • Video
  • New window. Album CND Flickr
  • New window. Dossier Carmen. Johan Inger
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Tickets

    • Carmen. Johan Inger

    • A CORUÑA (SPAIN)

    • PALACIO DE LA ÓPERA
    • 22 & 23 November, 2019
    • Buy your tickets to see the CND in the Palacio de la Ópera
    • Don Quixote by José Carlos Martínez

    • MADRID (SPAIN)

    • TEATRO DE LA ZARZUELA
    • 10 to 22 December, 2019
    • External link to buy your tickets to see Carmen by the CND
    • The Nutcracker. José Carlos Martínez

    • SEVILLA (SPAIN)

    • TEATRO DE LA MAESTRANZA
    • 9 to 12 January, 2020 - 20h
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    • Abstract image

    • MADRID (SPAIN)

    • AUDITORIO NACIONAL DE MÚSICA
    • 8 March, 2020
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    • Carmen Johan Inger. Picture: Jong-Duk Woo

    • VALENCIA (SPAIN)

    • PALAU DE LES ARTS
    • 26 to 29 March, 2020
    • External link to buy your tickets to see the CND in the Palau de les Arts
    • Carmen by Johan Inger

    • PERPIGNAN (FRANCE)

    • THÉÂTRE DE L'ARCHIPEL
    • 6 & 7 May, 2020
    • External link to buy your tickets to see the CND in Théâtre de l'Archipel
      • Por Vos Muero. Nacho Duato

      • LUDWIGSBURG (GERMANY)

      • FORUM AM SCHLOSSPARK LUDWIGSBURG
      • 17 & 18 July, 2020

Auditions

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Credits

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  • Project Coordination: Maite Villanueva (CND)
  • Texts: CND